Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

A KIC 8462852 (4 dips in 2017)

  1. Oct 15, 2015 #1
    There doesn't seem to be a thread about this, but it's very popular in the news today. I thought it'd be good to have a place to discuss it here.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 15, 2015 #2

    Borg

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

  4. Oct 16, 2015 #3

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Some really intriguing light curves here. Read the article for some explanation.

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astr...ge_dips_in_brightness_are_a_bit_baffling.html

    star_alien_dips.png

    Look at the smooth curve lower left. That has got to be a single body transit. Multiple bodies couldn't make such a smooth curve. Yet that body results in a 15% drop in the light curve!
    And it's cold, so not a companion star.

    I don't see how exo-comet fragments can explain this.

    Black dwarf? :smile:
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2015
  5. Oct 16, 2015 #4
    Can we be sure that the obstructing bodies are local to KIC 8462852's system? Are they known to be in orbit around KIC 8462852?
    Perhaps they appear so large because they may be a group of stray asteroids which are much closer to us than we think, and not in fact in orbit.
     
  6. Oct 16, 2015 #5

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    That's been considered, yes.
    The problem is, the farther from the star the more incredibly unlikely that they would line up and stayed lined up.
     
  7. Oct 16, 2015 #6


    The universe isn't old enough for black dwarfs, they would still be brown dwarfs radiating mad infrared at least.
     
  8. Oct 17, 2015 #7

    nsaspook

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

  9. Oct 17, 2015 #8
    Shouldn't a part of Dyson Sphere be a bit closer thus obscure its star in more regular and frequent pattern?
    Those aliens really do a shoddy work and park their panels on wrong orbits. Next time, when they arrive to make crop circles someone would have to explain that to them ;)

    EDIT: Media are delighted because right now no explanation is really convincing, but this "alien did it" part is also not so good.

    Personally I'd opt for some collision stuff, planets with rings and selection bias.
     
  10. Oct 17, 2015 #9

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    It's not out of the question that the star itself is variable. It doesn't fit any known categories, but in 1994 neither did Gamma Doradus. (Now it's in the category of "Gamma Doradus variables".)
     
  11. Oct 17, 2015 #10

    nsaspook

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    This is another case where IMO it takes 'Two to Tango'. Someone with book on Aliens sees the KIC 8462852 paper, makes a juicy line and calls a media friend to push it. The media person calls the author of the original paper and pushes them for an Alien connection that they probably laugh at and say sure that's, possible.

    Next stop, Dyson Sphere and Time Ships.
     
  12. Oct 17, 2015 #11
    Aliens: Thank you, Earth ape. We'd love to have a look at one of your designs.
     
  13. Oct 17, 2015 #12
    That lightcurve looks very similar (except for it's magnitude) to the one produced by KIC12557548, which is discussed in this Scientific American blog from May 2012. They also give a possible explanation.
     
  14. Oct 18, 2015 #13

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    Same group too.
     
  15. Oct 18, 2015 #14

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I know. Looking for plausible explanations.
     
  16. Oct 18, 2015 #15

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Once we blow through all the alien jokes, maybe we can talk serious. :wink:
     
  17. Oct 19, 2015 #16
    It was new to me, I had to wiki it. Any new ideas bubbling up out there?
     
  18. Oct 19, 2015 #17

    Andy Resnick

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    Here it is, captured @ 85/2, 1 hr integration time, 300% magnification:

    KIC%208462852_zps3dguzl5u.jpg
     
  19. Oct 19, 2015 #18

    Dotini

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Here's a new idea from 1957:

    220px-THBLCKCLDH1957.jpg
     
  20. Oct 19, 2015 #19

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I KNEW it!
    Look at that giant ring. Aliens, plain as day!
    :woot:
     
  21. Oct 19, 2015 #20
    So the object in orbit is very close, has too little mass to create much of a wobble in the host star, but covers a surface area much larger than Jupiter?
    Giant ring huh? Obviously a Halo joke, but it gave me an idea.

    If you tipped Saturn on it's side like Uranus and put it close to the sun, would it block enough light? It'd be quite variable since sometimes you'd see the rings head on and it'd block only as much light as the planet disc itself, but sometimes you'd see the rings from "above" and it'd have a shadow of hundreds of thousands of miles.

    If the planet is that close to the star, it's moons are probably quite active and could easily create a ring I wo
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2015
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: KIC 8462852 (4 dips in 2017)
  1. KIC 7917485b Discovery (Replies: 3)

  2. 2017 eclipse photos (Replies: 68)

Loading...