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Classical Kinematics refresher

  1. Jul 5, 2015 #1
    I'm a junior in physics, and I had a really embarrassing experience lately with some freshmen.

    Basically, within the major I have earned straight A's in all my physics courses since freshman year, I'm the student body president of the physics majors, and I'm doing a summer REU at one of the best schools in the country for physics. And the two freshmen I was talking to, who were in physics 1 as a summer course at my main school, asked for help with some basic kinematics problems and I realized I barely remember anything from the course and I was helpless.

    It's probably due to the fact that I have not taken any mechanics-related courses, so far I've only done the electromagnetism, modern physics, and optics sequences, but I really should know basic kinematics, especially because 1.) my pride was wounded and I felt dumb and 2.) I'm signed up for classical dynamics in the fall.

    I'm not really looking for a full textbook on kinematics or mechanics, but just a primer or refresher on kinematics for someone who has taken advanced math and physics courses but has forgotten some of the basic physics 101 kinematics stuff.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 5, 2015 #2
  4. Jul 11, 2015 #3
    Any of the following textbooks would be of good use - all are calculus-based physics texts for engineering (will be basic for you). Volume 1 is all that you need. I used Knight to self-study for the AP Physics C exams and Young/Freedman was the textbook used for our calculus-based physics sequence in college. Both are real good and Halliday and Resnick also garnered really good review from peers who self-studied for the AP test.

    University Physics (Young & Freedman) OR Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Knight) OR Fundamentals of Physics (Halliday & Resnick).
     
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