Kinetic energy loss in a gravitational field.

  • Thread starter pcmattpope
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  • #26
WannabeNewton
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Yes because in the force based formulation of Newtonian gravity, given appropriate boundary conditions there is a unique way to separate the derivative operator ##\nabla## from the gravitational potential ##\varphi##. In the standard metric formulation of GR this is not possible. In the geometrized formulation of Newtonian gravity (in which gravity is also a manifestation of space-time curvature) we run again into the same problem as in GR of having no meaningful notion of local gravitational energy density.
 
  • #27
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A compressed spring stores its energy in the electromagnetic field between the atoms. It is just potential energy ;).
 
  • #28
Dale
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Closed pending moderation.

EDIT: this thread will remain closed due to some speculation. The answer to the question has been given: the energy is stored in the gravitational field. As mfb mentioned, energy is usually stored in fields at some level.
 
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