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Kinetic Energy to Electricity

  1. Aug 18, 2010 #1
    Direct to the point,

    Is it possible to convert Kinetic Energy into an Electricity or Electrical Energy?? How?? Without using...like wind, hydro, and etc...
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 18, 2010 #2
    Yes. For further details of the contraption, please state what physical body's kinetic energy you intend to use.
     
  4. Aug 18, 2010 #3

    Born2bwire

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    That's what a generator does. A windmill, hydroelectric plant, nuclear plant, oil plant, etc. are all methods of providing mechanical energy to turn a generator to create electricity. There are not too many methods that do not directly involve kinetic energy. Solar cells and chemical cells are two major exceptions.
     
  5. Aug 18, 2010 #4
    My Question here is to convert kinetic energy to a electrical energy without using of the power plants or the windmill, hydro and nuclear plant , etc .... Is it possible??
     
  6. Aug 18, 2010 #5
    kinetic energy of what?
     
  7. Aug 18, 2010 #6
    kinetic energy of a bicycle
     
  8. Aug 18, 2010 #7

    Born2bwire

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    I got one! You could make a long cylinder and at either end have a thermocouple. If you fill the cylinder with say steel shot and keep rotating the cylinder so that the shot falls and strikes the ends of the cylinder, you will eventually increase the temperature of the shot due to the kinetic energy of the falls and collisions. This increase in temperature will create a voltage difference on the thermocouple. You could hook it up to say a water wheel or windmill to turn it...

    Well in that case just hook up a generator to the wheel. They already have such things for bikes to power a headlight.
     
  9. Aug 18, 2010 #8

    ZapperZ

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    Strap on a large magnet on your back while riding a bicycle, and repeatedly ride through a solenoid. There! You've just generated electricity from the kinetic energy of a bicycle.

    Why you'd want to do such a thing is beyond me, though.

    Zz.
     
  10. Aug 18, 2010 #9
    @Born2bwire
    Where can i get some generatorss?? Is still any other alternatives? :>

    @ZapperZ
    Hmmm . Good Idea . I'll make a research on yor idea.
     
  11. Aug 18, 2010 #10

    ZapperZ

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    Try basic electricity and magnetism concept called "Faraday's law".

    Zz.
     
  12. Aug 18, 2010 #11
    How about this:

    attachment.php?attachmentid=27624&stc=1&d=1282136458.png
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Aug 18, 2010 #12
    @Dickfore
    Thank you , hmm . I appreciated it :>
     
  14. Aug 18, 2010 #13

    Dale

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    Yes. This is exactly what regenerative braking on a hybrid vehicle does.
     
  15. Aug 18, 2010 #14

    RonL

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    I think I understand what your asking and where you want to go with the question.

    First let me ask a question, you rejected wind and then accepted a moving bicycle, if you set on a stationary bicycle in a 15 mph wind, or peddle a bicycle 15 mph in a stationary air mass, what is different about energy recovery from either action?

    I personally would rather set on the bicycle and do nothing, while capturing energy, than work my buns off and try to recover energy from my actions.

    The mechanics of capture and conversion can take on many forms.

    Ron
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2010
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