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L-edge of absorption

  1. May 17, 2009 #1
    What is the L-edge of absorption? For example, Si has its L2,3 edge at 99.8 eV? The second atomic shell is L, but what does 2,3 mean?

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 17, 2009 #2
    The k-edge and L edge of an atom refers to the minimum energy (or maximum wavelength) photon (UV or x-ray) that can remove an (photo) electron from the K or L shells (usually meaning ionize), such that other bound electrons cascade down to fill the vacancies. The photon energies correspond to "edges" in a plot of photon attenuation vs. photon energy where there is a sudden large increase in the attenuation coecfficient. Figure 1 in this reference shows a k-shell photoelectron ejection, with the possible atomic electron cascades.
    http://www.bruker-axs.de/fileadmin/user_upload/xrfintro/sec1_1.html
    L(2,3) may refer to the electron transition that fills the L shell vacancy (M-shell to L-shell)
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2009
  4. May 17, 2009 #3
    Thanks for the reply, Bob. That's a very nice reference, and now I understand.
     
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