L=T+w? (Lagrangian dynamics)

  • Thread starter enricfemi
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while facing dissipation systems, some books define the L with L=T+w.
is it universal?
where is its limits?
THX!
 

Ben Niehoff

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How is w defined? I've never seen it written this way.
 
How is w defined? I've never seen it written this way.
w is the work done on the dynamical system, on matter whether it is dissipative or not.
 

Ben Niehoff

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So, can you give an example of an expression for w, when there is dissipation?
 
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I've never seen it written in finite form like that, but I would expect that w to represent the work done on the system.

Hamilton's Principle can be written as
int(variation of (T*) + variation(W))dt = 0
where that W is the work of the several forces acting on the system. This is the way that nonconservative forces are included into the formulation of the system equations of motion.
 
i got it!

thanks Ben Niehoff and Dr.D.
 

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