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Lateral acceleration

  1. Oct 17, 2004 #1
    The cornering performance of an automobile is evaluated on a skid pad, where the maximum speed that a car can maintain around a circular path on a dry, flat surface is measured. Then the centripetal acceleration, also called the lateral acceleration, is calculated as a multiple of the free-fall acceleration g. The main factors affecting the performance are the tire characteristics and the suspension system of the car. A Dodge Viper GTS can negotiate a skidpad of radius 62.2 m at 86.5 km/h. Calculate its maximum lateral acceleration.

    How do I find lateral acceleration??
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 17, 2004 #2
    anyone know?
     
  4. Oct 17, 2004 #3
    I tried using the equation for centripetal acceleration but the answer was not correct.
     
  5. Oct 17, 2004 #4
    Let's see your calculations first before entirely discarding centripetal acceleration
     
  6. Oct 17, 2004 #5
    nevermind, i got the answer by converting km/h to m/h. But theres one question that is really stumping me right now:

    3. [PSE6 6.P.011.] A 3.85 kg object is attached to a vertical rod by two strings as in Figure P6.11. The object rotates in a horizontal circle at constant speed 7.30 m/s.

    Figure P6.11

    (a) Find the tension in the upper string.
    N
    (b) Find the tension in the lower string.
    N

    Not sure just what to do for this one, I tried a few equations given in examples by pluging in numbers, but didn't work.
     
  7. Oct 17, 2004 #6
    I figured the units conversion was messing you up. Where are the strings attached to the rod? We can't give a definitive solution otherwise. Are they attached at the top and bottom so it swings in a path that's in the center of where the two strings are attached?
     
  8. Oct 17, 2004 #7
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