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Latex question:

  1. May 6, 2008 #1
    I'm having some trouble with LaTex.

    Here is the LaTex code:

    \frac{1}{q_{2}} = \frac{A q_{1} + B}{C q_{1} + D}

    And it should produce this:

    [tex]\frac{1}{q_{2}} = \frac{A q_{1} + B}{C q_{1} + D}[/tex]

    Here, it's produced just fine. But in TeXnicCenter, it produces this instead:

    [tex]1\frac{}{q_{2} = \frac{A q_{1} + B}{C q_{1} + D}}[/tex]


    What am I doing wrong?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 6, 2008 #2
    Well, I figured it out, but I don't know why I should have to do this: I surrounded both fractions with \left. and \right. (the invisible boundaries) and it works fine now.

    \left.\frac{1}{q_{2}\right.= \left.\frac{A q_{1} + B}{C q_{1} + D}\right.

    [tex]\left.\frac{1}{q_{2}}\right.= \left.\frac{A q_{1} + B}{C q_{1} + D}\right.[/tex]
     
  4. May 7, 2008 #3
    When you want to display math you should switch to math mode by enclosing the equations like the following:

    \[
    \frac{1}{q_2} = \frac{A q_{1} + B}{C q_{1} + D}
    \]

    OR

    $$
    \frac{1}{q_2} = \frac{A q_{1} + B}{C q_{1} + D}
    $$

    If you want have have math within a block of text, ie. in-line, use single $ ... $.
     
  5. May 9, 2008 #4

    Gokul43201

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Tagging on here, as it appears the above question has been answered (and it seemed excessive to start a new thread).

    How does one correctly display the Angstrom symbol with the A correctly positioned below the circle?

    The standard approach gives me this: [tex]\AA[/tex]

    I know there's a workaround that I've used before but can not recall.

    Edit: Nevermind, got it: Mathring [tex]\mathring{A}[/tex]
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2008
  6. May 9, 2008 #5

    malawi_glenn

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    [tex]10^{-10}\text{m}= 1 \mathring{\text{A}}[/tex]
     
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