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B Leakage current

  1. Nov 17, 2015 #1
    If the dielectric breakdown occurs in a parallel plate capacitor ,then leakage current is
    ##I##=##\frac{V}{R}##=##\frac{VA}{ρd}##
    I want to know what does each stand for?
    I=Current
    V=Voltage or volume
    R=radius or resistance
    A=area of the plate
    ρ=density
    d=Distance between the plates
    Am I correct?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 17, 2015 #2
    The correct meaning is given in whichever textbook you are reading. V is not the volume, R is not the radius, and ρ is not the density. What made you feel that V is the volume, for example?
     
  4. Nov 17, 2015 #3
    No.
     
  5. Nov 17, 2015 #4
    If you know please tell me.
     
  6. Nov 17, 2015 #5
    I just guessed.
     
  7. Nov 17, 2015 #6

    sophiecentaur

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    I should get hold of another text book, if I were you. Every decent text book defines the variables in its equations. Look at the back of the book for a list of symbols used. A letter is just a letter until it has been defined.
     
  8. Nov 17, 2015 #7

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    You may need to look back many pages to find the definition of each term, but they must be defined by the author writing the equation.
     
  9. Nov 17, 2015 #8

    sophiecentaur

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    Sometimes, it's a lot less trouble to ask PF. (?) :wink:
     
  10. Nov 17, 2015 #9
    But I have found this in a google book.And there is no definition in back pages.
     
  11. Nov 18, 2015 #10
    The first part is just Ohm's law. Check it out. Did you learn about it?
    In the second part the resistance is expressed in terms of the parameters of the resistor.
     
  12. Nov 18, 2015 #11

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    Then this book is not a good source for learning this material. You should not have to ask this type of question. The real problem to address here is the textbook you are using, not the specific formulas.

    I am closing this thread. Please go to the textbook forum ( https://www.physicsforums.com/forums/science-and-math-textbooks.21/ ) and open a new thread or search for an old one with advice on a better resource.
     
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