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Learning about superconductors

  1. Nov 29, 2011 #1
    Well, right now I am a high school student taking AP Physics C, BC cac and AP chem and I want to self learn about superconductors.
    I have looked online and at my school library and have had little to no luck finding any documents that I can learn from. My goal is to learn about superconductors so that I can attempt to make one for the science fair in San Francisco in May, so I would really appreciate it if you could give me some advise on some material I should check out.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 29, 2011 #2
    Sounds kinda dangerous. I doubt your school will allow you to do it. Check out LHC explosion
     
  4. Nov 29, 2011 #3
    I know it is dangerous, which is why I plan on spending a lot of time learning the theory behind it before moving onto the practical
     
  5. Nov 29, 2011 #4
    If your planning to measure how resistance drops at lower tempatures, then it might be practical. If you wanted to pass a high current becuase of superconductivity, thats slightly impractical.
     
  6. Nov 29, 2011 #5
    You mean to produce a SC material yourself? It won't be easy to get the materials and equipment for producing high temperature SC.
    As for the more "classical" SCs, the low temperatures required may be difficult to produce and maintain in a science fair.

    The SC are not dangerous, if you can get some. A high temperature SC ceramic cooled with liquid nitrogen is a quite common classroom demonstration of superconductivity.
     
  7. Nov 29, 2011 #6
    But what books should I get to learn about superconductors?
     
  8. Nov 30, 2011 #7

    NascentOxygen

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    Staff: Mentor

    I'd first do with a google search.
     
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