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Legs touch the lock?

  1. Jul 2, 2007 #1
    I have a road bike with a D lock. But where ever I place my lock, my legs seem to touch the lock when pedaling. Anyone else have this problem? What do you do?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 2, 2007 #2
    I dont ride around with a D-lock on a road bike, AHAHAHAHAHAH.

    Did you actually buy a road bike and plan to lock it around a lightpost? :rofl:

    Oh boy, ohhhhhhhh boy.

    I give you a week before its stolen. You didnt buy that hunka junk for $500 bucks did ya?
     
  4. Jul 2, 2007 #3
    I dunno that a D-Lock will do much to be honest. I guess it depends on the D-Lock. If your gonna lock up a bike of any value up here, you better take off the wheels and seat or they go missing pretty quick, if they don't just take the bike. Most bike locks are pretty pathetic if someone really wants to take your bike.

    i.e.

    The only place I can think of mounting it is on the top of the frame or the back of the frame, if neither of those work, I would say you're outta luck.

    I use a piece of sh-- $100 bike to get anywhere where I will need to lock it up, and use my more expensive bike for recreational biking. I couldn't give a crap if the $100 bike gets stolen. But I use a chain lock that easily wraps around the frame when I ride.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  5. Jul 2, 2007 #4
    i never lock my bicycle anywhere i go, supermarket, school, rarely there are thefts around but people usually lock their bikes i see.
    perhaps my bike does not cost much and pretty old (only a winter, all new bike become old)

    if it's worth stealing or robbing, i suggest a bank or at least hundred thousands of dollars instead of a bicycle.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2007
  6. Jul 2, 2007 #5
    I did buy that bike. It rides very smooth. $500 Aus isn't bad. Lightposts are strong enough. But I was planning to lock it around posts specially designed to lock bikes. It is pretty safe where I live. I use to have a $500 mountain with a D lock and it never got stolen. Are D locks and chain locks the only options?
     
  7. Jul 2, 2007 #6

    Astronuc

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    I used an old D- or U- lock where I had to disconnect the front wheel and lock it to frame or rear wheel, but only during the day. At night the bike would be in doors.

    The D-lock fit into a bracket such that the plane of the lock was coplanar with the plane of the bike frame. If one's knees/legs are hitting the lock, change the orientation of the legs when pedalling. Knees should travel up and down with little or no lateral movement.
     
  8. Jul 2, 2007 #7
    Wow, I really wanna smack you in the forehead for buying that bike. Did you put those mud fenders on it yet?
     
  9. Jul 2, 2007 #8

    turbo

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    Everybody needs to set their expectations and their budgets, and for the $500 you probably got a better bike than most folks own. We aren't all Lance Armstrong, and if the truth were known, Lance could probably get on your bike, and smack down all but the world's most elite riders.

    I've still got a 15 y/o mountain bike that I paid about $300 for, and with proper maintenance, it's still got pretty much all the original hardware, except for a chain and tires, as needed and brake pads. Mountain-bike or road-bike dilettantes would turn up their noses at it, but it's practical, rugged, and reliable. I'm not Lance Armstrong, and I don't need gear that is aimed at his market, nor anywhere near. If you enjoy your bike, that's all that counts.
     
  10. Jul 2, 2007 #9
  11. Jul 2, 2007 #10

    chroot

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    You are entirely correct that not everyone is (or should attempt to be) Lance Armstrong. Instead, a prospective bicycle owner should look at what he/she intends to do with a bicycle, how he/she intends to ride it, and then make an informed selection.

    You apparently didn't read the thread where pivoxa15 was asking for advice. He had perhaps five experienced cyclists, including myself and cyrus, telling him not to get a road bike. The things he wants to do with a bike (riding on rough or wet pavement, riding in inclement wather, carrying cargo, using fenders, racks, lights, etc.) are not really compatible with a road racing bike. Neither is carrying around a three-pound U-lock bolted to the frame.

    Of course, he pretty much ignored five pages of careful advice and just got the bike everyone was telling him not to buy anyway.

    Again, you're out in left field. We were all encouraging him to get a touring or cyclocross bike with better components and a more practical design.

    pivoxa15, if you want my advice (not that you'd actually, you know, listen to it or anything), I'd either get a cable lock, or buy a messenger bag to carry your U-lock. Neither cable locks nor U-locks are any more secure than the other. Both can be defeated in a couple of minutes by a thief with the right tool. Often it comes down to a 50/50 chance on what kinds of tools the thieves happen to have that day.

    - Warren
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2007
  12. Jul 2, 2007 #11
    I mean, look. All the bikes on the rack are going to be a crappy POS. And then there will be your nice spankin new road bike with a D-lock on it. Hmmmm, which bike would I steal if I were a thief?

    Have you ever seen a nice road bike on a bicycle rack before? I never have. People who own road bikes take it inside with them, they dont leave them outside on a bike rack!

    I give it a week before its gone.

    If you dont listen to anything else, listen to this: Take your bike inside with you when you go places for more than 20 mins.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2007
  13. Jul 2, 2007 #12

    berkeman

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    Well, based on how successful we were in the other thread, and since the OP already has the bike, and says that it's pretty safe where he will be parking the bike...

    On my MTB, I have a little under-seat carrying pouch (about 1 liter total storage volume) for tire-fixing tools and small bits and pieces. I have a cable lock with a quality padlock (which can be cut with 50cm bolt cutters probably) that I coil around my seat post above the under-seat pouch. I face the padlock backwards, resting on the pouch. It stays in position usually, except for when things get pretty rough (hey, it's a mountain bike!). When it rotates in a rough section, I just reach back and rotate it to the rear-facing position again.

    I lock up my MTB in some places, but not for long usually. If I'm going to run into the grocery store or something in the middle of a ride, having the lock makes it possible. But I'm well aware of the reality that it could be stolen. My MTB is probably 6-8 years old now, with a lot of mixed terrain miles. To replace it new is probably around $500-$700 at this point, so it is in the ballpark of the OP's bike quality.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2007
  14. Jul 2, 2007 #13

    chroot

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  15. Jul 2, 2007 #14

    JasonRox

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    Putting a D-Lock on a road bike is like wearing white socks with black pants. You just look like a fool.
     
  16. Jul 2, 2007 #15
    This has already been posted in the thread. I believe it gives an inaccurate representation, actually. The "thief" here was too casual and confident; so much so that others probably assumed that it was his own bicycle he was trying to free. No real thief would dare spend minutes conspicuously trying to break apart a lock. But the video certainly shows how easily the locks themselves can be broken.

    pivoxa, if you aren't able to find a place indoors of your workplace or wherever to keep your bicycle, you might be better off just not bringing it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2007
  17. Jul 2, 2007 #16

    JasonRox

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    Well, that's exactly what professional thieves in the city does. Search for thieves caught in action stuff... but keep in mind that you're looking for clips that are found in the city life and not in the back alley of some small town.
     
  18. Jul 2, 2007 #17

    chroot

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    I don't know, if I were a real bike thief I would do my best to make it look like it was my bike, and I was legitimately trying to recover it after losing the key to its lock.

    Hopefully, if a nearby shop owner sees someone "forgetting their key" every other day, he'll eventually call the police. It's doubtful, though, that anyone will even care.

    It's an exercise in what sociologists call "diluted responsibility." No one really want the hassle of trying to detain a bike thief. No one really wants to have their morning spoiled by a fist fight in the street, or a long detainment by the police while they sort everything out. Most people just look at the thief, think to themselves "well, he's probably stealing it, but it's just an old bike, and I'd rather not have my day ruined by trying to stop him." As a result, most people just walk past, hopeful that someone else will deal with it.

    - Warren
     
  19. Jul 2, 2007 #18

    JasonRox

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    It's true though. I personally wouldn't want to bother with it. I can see myself saying things to stop people doing inapropriate things say stealing for a bike, but after awhile if it happens a lot, I won't give a ****.
     
  20. Jul 2, 2007 #19
    I live in Australia and that bike was from my LBS with one year of free service. You won't find a new road bike under $500 in Australia unless if the gears are changed not via the handlebar but in the lower part of the frame where the drink carriers are.
     
  21. Jul 2, 2007 #20
    I always wanted a road bike. It so happens that I plan to use it for travelling puropses predominantly riding to uni. As well as riding for the sake of it.

    I assume unis are safer than other places to park? There is actually a place in the maths building that I can park my bike. So its indoors but still it will be out of my sight for the whole day. I'd have to get there pretty early though because there are only 5 spots.

    The only other places I might park are outside libraries and supermarkets in well off surburbs.

    Somone said that mudguards didn't slow you down so I don't know why road racers wouldn't want to put one on on a rainy day during a race.

    Are cable locks just like chain locks except with a better name? I sampled a cable lock but it didn't stretch out very well. Too tight to pull it to its full length.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2007
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