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Lenz Law

  1. Apr 19, 2008 #1
    suppose you have a solenoid with hollow core connected to a galvanometer.

    On one side you have a S-N magnet (ie. the N pole is nearer to the solenoid). On the other side you have a N-S magnet( ie. S pole is nearer to solenoid). ie.

    [S - N] [Solenoid] [N - S]

    Both magnets are equidistant from the solenoid, and at a distance sufficient for the solenoid to "detect" the magnetic field.

    They start moving towards each other at the same speed into the solenoid core and stop at the same time.

    My prediction is that there will be absolutely no current shown in the galvanometer. This is because it is impossible to have N poles on both sides of the solenoid to oppose the motion.

    As this topic is new to me, is my prediction correct?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 19, 2008 #2
    You have a contradition between your text and your graph that you might want to clear-up.
     
  4. Apr 20, 2008 #3
    Apologies. It should read:

    On one side you have a S-N magnet (ie. the N pole is nearer to the solenoid). On the other side you have a N-S magnet( ie. N pole is nearer to solenoid). ie.

    [S - N] [Solenoid] [N - S]
     
  5. Apr 20, 2008 #4
    It is true that you will register no current. The reason is that the two magnets induce exactly opposing currents, which cancel.
     
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