Let's climb a POLE!

  • Thread starter InducJunc
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  • #1
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Hey guys, with little to none FORMAL physics application experience myself, but quite a bit from the other members in my club. I was wondering what you guys think the fastest methods to climbing a pole would be. Some limitations we have are : one 12vDC battery, only 2 motors (about 150 rpm), and we can't use springs. We have to climb a about 10 foot pole, and we want to do it in less than 8 seconds or as fast as possible. The pole is made of steel. One idea (aside from simpler approaches) that we arrived at (but did not have the expertise to continue with) was to use a electromagnetic propulsion system (similar to Maglev trains?), where we have electromagnets alternating to propel up the pole. We do have a 15 lbs weight limit.

Thanks!
 

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  • #2
Integral
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We have not found the rule which clearly prohibits springs. Can you give me a reference?
 
  • #3
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If you're talking about FRC, it's not in the allowed parts. Though I'd wait until Q's and A's for clarification. (Btw lets not turn this into a FRC thread we got Chief Delphi for that!)
 
  • #4
FIRST Robotic's team, eh?
I am so pumped for competition though! :] GO ROBOTS!
 
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  • #5
Borek
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Get off me.
 
  • #6
Ranger Mike
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Ifin you are into alternatives..I recommend hiring a PRO to do the climbing!
 

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  • #7
Ifin you are into alternatives..I recommend hiring a PRO to do the climbing!

I do agree, hire a monkey.
 
  • #8
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Can't you just clamp two wheels (each attached to a motor) to opposite sides of the pole and then switch the battery on?

You would need something to stabilise the rig on the pole and keep it running true.

No need for anything complicated.
 
  • #9
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Can't you just clamp two wheels (each attached to a motor) to opposite sides of the pole and then switch the battery on?

Almost exactly what I would do, only I'd use 4 wheels, 2 driven. Great minds must think alike.

You would need something to stabilise the rig on the pole and keep it running true.

That's what the other 2 wheels are for.

The only drawback is that the clamping force required may exceed what the wheels can cope with if the rig is heavy or the cable is very thin. You could also use a braking system to prevent it from rolling back down.
 
  • #10
Ranger Mike
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this is a zero backlash friction drive used on a machine i sell. note groved drive pulley and tension pulley opposite,
 

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  • #11
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The only drawback is that the clamping force required may exceed what the wheels can cope with if the rig is heavy or the cable is very thin. You could also use a braking system to prevent it from rolling back down.

I was actually thinking about that.

Without knowing the details of the motors we don't know what they are capable of.

Given there's a 1kg weight limit, when you consider the battery and the motors alone I wouldn't think they're up to much.
 
  • #12
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First one of the mentors says I'm a good stripper, next thing I know we're hiring Maglev's monkey to do a pole dance without any springs and under 15 lbs. I need to show up at the meetings more; I have no idea how things got so weird.
 
  • #13
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mag levs dont use motors. the propulsion is built into the track. your only option is attaching wheels to motors and using good old friction as stated above. i would recommend a rubber track instead of wheels, as the rubber track has more surface area for grip. i would also only use one motor to keep the weight down, via a gear transfer case to drive the entire system. pick the lightest motor making the most torque and the lightest battery pack with just enough charge to traverse the length of the pole. Unless you can use the pole itself as a ground and a thin wire as a positive lead.

use as much plastic as you can. the lightest solution will be the fastest one. This is an excersize of weight reduction.

you will have to play with gear ratios in the transfer case to optimise the torque and RPM of your motor.
 
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  • #14
Integral
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This is a race between 4 'bots, the first to the top of the pole wins, there are 4 poles. The pole is steel, 1.75" in diameter and 10' tall.

The design constraints require that we use motor driven wheels to climb. The next problem is that it must come down easily and not in a free fall.
 
  • #15
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This is a race between 4 'bots, the first to the top of the pole wins, there are 4 poles. The pole is steel, 1.75" in diameter and 10' tall.

The design constraints require that we use motor driven wheels to climb. The next problem is that it must come down easily and not in a free fall.

I must enquire, where did you get the rules from? Is it possible to get a link so anyone wanting to contribute knows what constraints there are?
 

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