Light Glows around Spouse in Dark Room

  • #1
My husband and I have been married 26 years and we have lived in our home 15 years. Last night is the first time I ever saw this or anything like this.

We sleep in a king size bed in total darkness. We live in the country so no bright outdoor lights, passing traffic, etc. We sleep with the bedroom door locked, blinds down and curtains closed. We have two bedside lamps. A tall dark wooden solid headboard. Dark black comforter with tropic flower pattern, white sheets and white pillow cases. We have digital clock with red tinted digits on his bedside table. We have a cordless phone that is plugged in at night on his bedside table. At the foot of the bed on the tall dresser against the wall we have a 23 inch TV. We have a ceiling fan over the bed with three light kit. And an adjoining bathroom with the door left open. I share all this detail because I am aware that electronic items pull electricity even when not turned on if still plugged in, and don't know if it could be a factor.

I woke in middle of night about 3 am for no particular reason and looked toward my husband. He was turned toward me and was in the middle of the bed. I remember having a feeling like my husband needed me to have more tenderness and compassion for him, like I should take better care of him or pay more attention to him. (we have a pretty normal marriage. as all we have had difficult times but we have overcome it all and are very committed to our marriage. just want to eliminate that factor.)

As the thought finished passing through my mind, I saw a light around my husband. It was not a flashlight. It was more like a soft diffused white light shining around him from his waist up around his head. It stayed lit for a second or two and went off. Odd, but maybe I didn't really see that, I thought.

Still looking at him, neither he or I moved, I saw the light again, come on, be around him and go off. Now this got my attention.

So I really was looking and it happen once again. All three times it was pretty identical and all happen with a short span of time... maybe a minute or so.

After that I started to move my hands around him in the air to see if maybe a motion light had turned on. (at one time I had this kind of light that I used to read at night. It was an led light that could be turned on or it could be set to being a motion light, or turned off. This light has been missing but since I was used to having a motion light before it was the first explanation that popped into my head.

Moving my arms around my husband in the bed, I woke up my husband who was asking me all types of questions, "are you OK, what are you doing?, is something wrong" I didn't answer immediately because I didn't want to disturb the light or the chance of figuring out what it was. I guess I am an inquisitive person. I sat up, looked all around, over my husband and finally said, "I saw something." What? he asked.

At first I didn't want to say, kind of a weird happening... but finally I told him. we couldn't figure it out or come up with an explanation so we went to sleep.

I have remembered it a few time during this day, and wonder what happen.

In thinking about it, the light was not shining down from a source, nor was it emitting light throughout the room or even toward me. I saw nothing but the light around him. The soft white light was only about a few inches off the surface of my husband's upper body, and it did go around his head but not up to the headboard.

It was not a flash, or a split second. It stayed a basic solid soft white light for 1-2 seconds and then went out.

It was more like a light was coming from or radiating out of my husband, but that is not the impression I had at night, that is an afterthought since I didn't see a source of light or a beam down toward him. My nighttime impression was a light was coming on and going off... It did not frighten me or worry me. It was just like... that is odd, really odd.

Since I spoke to him right after, and was cognitive of his questioning, I know I was not dreaming or in a sleep state.

Any possible scientific explanation?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Evo
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I think from your narrative that you really experienced this, so I hope people here don't start harrassing you.

There is no telling what you experienced. Sometimes the mind plays tricks on us, who knows. One of our former members would insist it was a temporal lobe seizure.
 
  • #3
EnumaElish
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  • #4
DaveC426913
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OK, well I think we can knock one of these off the list pretty quickly.

alberthadavid, is your husband a Marine Crustacean from Oregon? No? OK, moving on.
 
  • #5
alt
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Moving my arms around my husband in the bed, I woke up my husband who was asking me all types of questions, "are you OK, what are you doing?, is something wrong" I didn't answer immediately because I didn't want to disturb the light or the chance of figuring out what it was.

Hello alberthadavid.

Interesting experience. I just wanted to ask regarding the highlighted above; it reads like when your husband woke and spoke to you, you could still see the light as before he woke ? If so, for how long, and how did it go 'off' - instantly like a light switch, or did it fade slowly ?
 
  • #6
Ivan Seeking
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I was looking around and found one possible explanation on another board. Since I wasn't able to find a professional reference, I will quote the post directly. Keep in mind that this is as yet an unverified explanation. If anyone can verify this as a potential explanation, please provide a link.

If you stare at an object and the background is lighter than the object, you will see a "halo." This is from the combination of slip and the desensitisation of the retina.

The rods that are receiving the light from the background become less receptive. The rods that are receiving the light from the object are more receptive. As your eye drifts a bit, the light from the background hits the rods that are adjusted for the lower light coming from the object. The result is that you perceive brighter light around the edge of the object, compared with the dimmed-down light being reported by the over-stimulated parts of the retina that the background light is hitting.
http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=334201
 
  • #7
To me, this sounds like a kind of... well.. mild and somewhat pleasant 'Hypnopompic Hallucination'. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnopompic

This normal, although everyone doesn't have this experience, and in healthy adults seems to be more common as we age. I believe you saw exactly what you describe too, and I appreciate the level of detail. I want to emphasize that my explanation doesn't mean you're "hallucinating" a la LSD or mental illness... its perfectly usual, and nothing to be concerned about unless it recurs.

Others have already tackled the light issues better than I can.
 
  • #8
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I occasionally have hallucinations while in the process of waking from sleep, but they're usually not visual. A few weeks ago, for example, I woke up in the middle of the night convinced that bugs were crawling on me. After about 15 seconds, I was able to calm my mind down and realize I was just coming out of a dream.

My mother gets visual hallucinations like you experienced fairly often. She often tells us stories about weird things she "saw" while waking up in the middle of the night. She once hallucinated that my father had antennae growing out of his head. She woke up him when she was feeling around on his forehead trying to examine his antennae. She said she was 100% sure she saw them, but accepted it must have been a hallucination, rather than assuming my father was an alien.

You spoke a little of your emotions when you were in this state. I often experience INTENSE emotions waking up in the middle of the night like that. I believe nismarawork's explanation is the best one.
 
  • #9
EnumaElish
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OK, well I think we can knock one of these off the list pretty quickly.

alberthadavid, is your husband a Marine Crustacean from Oregon? No? OK, moving on.
Why are flamingos pink?
 
  • #10
Why are flamingos pink?

Because they're flamboyantly gay, and proud of it? I think that's why they stand that way too; my uncle does almost the same thing when he wears pink, but with his hand. I'm not kidding by the way, that's a true story about my uncle, whom I dearly love.

edit: Wait... did you mean this:
Wikipedia said:
Young flamingos hatch with grey plumage, but adults range from light pink to bright red due to aqueous bacteria and beta carotene obtained from their food....
... I guess that's plausible, but I like my explanation more.
 
  • #11
I occasionally have hallucinations while in the process of waking from sleep, but they're usually not visual. A few weeks ago, for example, I woke up in the middle of the night convinced that bugs were crawling on me. After about 15 seconds, I was able to calm my mind down and realize I was just coming out of a dream.

My mother gets visual hallucinations like you experienced fairly often. She often tells us stories about weird things she "saw" while waking up in the middle of the night. She once hallucinated that my father had antennae growing out of his head. She woke up him when she was feeling around on his forehead trying to examine his antennae. She said she was 100% sure she saw them, but accepted it must have been a hallucination, rather than assuming my father was an alien.

You spoke a little of your emotions when you were in this state. I often experience INTENSE emotions waking up in the middle of the night like that. I believe nismarawork's explanation is the best one.

It's weird to experience, and people seem to feel a need to believe it's BAD, but it's just a normal 'sleep disorder', which harms no one. As long as people are able to manage any anxiety that might occur from events such as waking paralysis, there's nothing wrong. Sleep is still VERY mysterious, not mystical, just very complex. I'd argue that it's kind of interesting to experience; not every person gets to "trip" without any harm whatsoever!
 
  • #12
EnumaElish
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alberthadavid, is your husband a Marine Crustacean from Oregon? No? OK, moving on.
This was pretty funny, though :LOL: ... :chuckle:
 
  • #13
Moving my arms around my husband in the bed, I woke up my husband who was asking me all types of questions, "are you OK, what are you doing?, is something wrong" I didn't answer immediately because I didn't want to disturb the light or the chance of figuring out what it was.

Hello alberthadavid.

Interesting experience. I just wanted to ask regarding the highlighted above; it reads like when your husband woke and spoke to you, you could still see the light as before he woke ? If so, for how long, and how did it go 'off' - instantly like a light switch, or did it fade slowly ?
The light was not on when I was moving my arms. I was trying to see if it could have been a motion sensored light since I had familiarity with having one before, and thought my arm movements would trip it on. I never saw it again, once he had awakened. When I said I didn't want to disturb the light - I meant the possibility of the light being tripped back on. In a way I was being a good observer not wanting to immediately speak as I was still trying to see if I could get the light to come back on with motion. It never showed again. Each time it seems to go off very quickly, I don't remember thinking it was like a light switch but it definitely was not a fading out, so it would be more like a light switch.
 
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  • #14
DaveC426913
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Just a tangent. Is your handle Albert had a vid or Albertha David?

Despite the word david hidden(?) in your handle, I saw Albert had a vid first.
 
  • #15
I was looking around and found one possible explanation on another board. Since I wasn't able to find a professional reference, I will quote the post directly. Keep in mind that this is as yet an unverified explanation. If anyone can verify this as a potential explanation, please provide a link.


http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=334201
THis is a very interesting point. So is this common to everyone's eyes or does it only happen at certain times. This seems to give some reasonable explanation. Does the appearance of the light around the object go on and off sometimes.
 
  • #16
Just a tangent. Is your handle Albert had a vid or Albertha David?

Despite the word david hidden(?) in your handle, I saw Albert had a vid first.
My grandmother's real name (missing the 4 middle names - I guess they didn't want to offend any relatives). She was a first generation natural born American to two parents that came to America through Elise Island during the potato famine. From my understanding her family was Scot-Irish.

Abertha Campbell was her given name, her surname at marriage was fully French marrying a first generation natural born American from two French parents. His name was Alphonse David.

Abertha and Alphonse caused quite a stir - both being Roman Catholic but Alphonse was definitely breaking customs by lowing the family line in marrying a Scot Irish woman. They remained married for life and both lived past 90.
 
  • #17
Ivan Seeking
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THis is a very interesting point. So is this common to everyone's eyes or does it only happen at certain times. This seems to give some reasonable explanation. Does the appearance of the light around the object go on and off sometimes.

Based on the explanation offered, it seems that subtle eye movements could account for the on-off effect.

If this is the correct explanation, then you might be able to duplicate the effect by trying again under the same conditions. I would expect that the conditions must be just right. In principle it should work for anyone, however it could also be that some people are more sensitive to the effect. For example, women generaly have more color receptors than men. No doubt some people have better night vision and higher sensitivity to low light levels, than do others.
 
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  • #18
I read this link to wikipedia... not a usual trusted source I use for fact. I do not this it was some type of hypnopomic experience. From the details on this page link, it did not seem to match my experience. I was not just going to sleep. I awoke after hours of sleep. I had time to think about my husband, and consider feeling for him and then I saw the light... I don't think I could have been sleeping, or coming out of sleep-state.
 
  • #19
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I read this link to wikipedia... not a usual trusted source I use for fact. I do not this it was some type of hypnopomic experience. From the details on this page link, it did not seem to match my experience. I was not just going to sleep. I awoke after hours of sleep. I had time to think about my husband, and consider feeling for him and then I saw the light... I don't think I could have been sleeping, or coming out of sleep-state.

Hypnopompic isn't just going to sleep. That would be hypnagogic. Hypnopompic is just waking up. You said in your original post that you were just waking up from being asleep. You said you woke up, had an emotion or thought about your husband, and then started seeing lights. This gives me the impression that you started seeing the light less than a minute after being awake.

As I said before, I often have hallucinations after waking up. I've had visual, auditory, and... I guess the word is tactile, hallucinations. I've been going back through my memory for weird things that I've experienced upon waking up in the middle of the night:

1) Hearing loud, thundering noises, like a giant stomping down the street. My parents heard nothing, though they were awake.

2) Seeing what I thought was an alligator in the river when I was staying at my grandparents' house. I had been awake long enough to wander into the living room and look out the picture window facing the water. There are no alligators where they live.

3) Seeing a "ghost" standing about 6 feet away from the foot of my bed. This vision persisted for what seemed like a few minutes before going away. I believed in ghosts for a good 8 years after that experience (I was about 10 years old)

4) Feeling a "presence" in my room, as if somebody was watching me. This was followed by an intense anxious feeling, even after I confirmed that I was alone in the house.

5) I've already mentioned the bugs crawling on me hallucination.

I'm sure there have been others, but those are the ones that stick out in my mind. It's a common occurrence to hallucinate shortly after waking up, from what I've read. Don't worry about it too much.
 
  • #20
FlexGunship
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I read this link to wikipedia... not a usual trusted source I use for fact. I do not this it was some type of hypnopomic experience. From the details on this page link, it did not seem to match my experience. I was not just going to sleep. I awoke after hours of sleep. I had time to think about my husband, and consider feeling for him and then I saw the light... I don't think I could have been sleeping, or coming out of sleep-state.

It might not apply to your post, but I was reminded of a quote a sleep-pathologist once said to me: "If you're not falling asleep, then you're still waking up."
 
  • #21
It seems to me that you may be telling partially the truth but not fully, I think what Alan says is possible for what you actually saw but not what you say you have seen.
 
  • #22
It seems to me that you may be telling partially the truth but not fully, I think what Alan says is possible for what you actually saw but not what you say you have seen.

Why assume a measure of deception when simple misinterpretation and subsequent wedding ot the notion is more likely? That just seems nasty.
 
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  • #23
Why assume a measure of deception when simple misinterpretation and subsequent wedding of the notion is more likely? That just seems nasty.

People have an instinct to fib, while it is true that often times people who see things thought they saw them a lot of times they also express the story more vibrantly then it really happened so people believe them.

Someone who thinks they saw big foot may have indeed actually thought he saw them, but when he says he was standing 10 yards away from him so that people believe him that is the great deception.

There's nothing wrong with lying, we naturally do it as humans and if you have the willpower to ALWAYS go against millions of years of evolution well then power to you, but we are humans and we're designed that way so I doubt that's the case.

Also, I assume it because all the things that "happen" if I listened to the witnesses who saw it then I would have to believe it, there's at least 1000 people who say they saw big foot close enough to know it was a big foot and of course there isn't one so of course they're lying somewhat.

Your mind is simply not so deceitful.

Also, this is skepticism and debunking forum yet all I have seen so far is everyone else believing everyone else... is anyone being skeptical?
 
  • #24
People have an instinct to fib, while it is true that often times people who see things thought they saw them a lot of times they also express the story more vibrantly then it really happened so people believe them.

Someone who thinks they saw big foot may have indeed actually thought he saw them, but when he says he was standing 10 yards away from him so that people believe him that is the great deception.

There's nothing wrong with lying, we naturally do it as humans and if you have the willpower to ALWAYS go against millions of years of evolution well then power to you, but we are humans and we're designed that way so I doubt that's the case.

Also, I assume it because all the things that "happen" if I listened to the witnesses who saw it then I would have to believe it, there's at least 1000 people who say they saw big foot close enough to know it was a big foot and of course there isn't one so of course they're lying somewhat.

Your mind is simply not so deceitful.

Also, this is skepticism and debunking forum yet all I have seen so far is everyone else believing everyone else... is anyone being skeptical?

re bold: You had me going there until that bit; you clearly haven't done as much reading as you have ranting. FlexGunship, DaveC, me, Russ_Waters, Jarednjames... and many more... are all definitely skeptics. Not cynics, which is what you are, but a skeptic; one who examines the world with a critical and incredulous eye BUT examines it nonetheless. What part of my saying this is a well documented class of sleep disturbance went past you, and then others saying the same?

Your rant is no longer based in reality; you're a cynic... a misanthrope, but seem to mistake your instant dismissal as skepticism. In fact, a skeptic examines the evidence and weighs it against the claim made, you don't just assume that everyone is constantly lying. That's actually as poor an assumption as believing that everyone is ALWAYS honest; it shows a lack of appreciation regarding social nuance, and I'm sorry that you see matters in such black and white terms.

Bottom line: Skepticism is based in science, which disallows the kinds of assumptions you've made thus far. General disbelief unfounded in a scientific method and view is really quite worthless; worse, it often is used as fodder by 'true believers'... the other side of your coin.

edit: btw, the speed of dark in a vacuum is less than or equal to the speed that light can vacate a region, and therefore can't exceed 'c'. Mystery solved.
 
  • #25
It seems to me that you may be telling partially the truth but not fully, I think what Alan says is possible for what you actually saw but not what you say you have seen.

That is actually what I said, I didn't just assume that the story was a total bluff and I realized that, that is probably unlikely. If you would show me a case or a document of someone seeing an intense glow for a period of time and intensity which was described to us I would be more then happy. I am a SKEPTIC, and yes good skeptics start by not believing then as evidence builds up they determine whether it is real or not I don't just assume they're telling the truth then try to find evidence for it or against. I just assume that there claims are what they saw or what they think they saw or what they want you to believe they saw , and I ask myself are they exaggerating, lying, or being totally honest? I believe in this scenario they're exaggerating I know that strange phenoms happen all the time but they often less amazing then described.
 

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