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Light particles

  1. Oct 23, 2005 #1
    If light particles do exist, then would they be smaller than the smallest particles currently recognised? Also if light contains particles, are the paticles of kinds of light, for example ultra violet vrs red, different, or would they probably be the same particles moving under different circumstances?
     
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  3. Oct 23, 2005 #2

    mathman

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    The defining characteristic of photons is energy. Ultraviolet have more energy than visible, etc.
     
  4. Oct 23, 2005 #3
    Light particles do exists, but take note that they are not classical particles.
    All fundamental particles are point particles, this includes for example electrons or quarks, the building blocks of protons and neutrons, or photons ("light particles").
    So they all have the same size, none.
    And as was already said color is commonly understood to go back to frequency of the light which means energy.
     
  5. Oct 24, 2005 #4
    If a light particle (photon) is indeed a point particle with no volume, how can it have energy?
    Here’s my thought, lets say the volume of a solid has an amount of energy, then the sum of the volume times its energy would equal some constant.
    V*E=C therefore E=C/V
    So, as the volume decreases the energy level will increase, but if the volume is reduced to 0, the equation is undefined. Ergo, how can a point of energy exist with out volume? I presume the mass to have remained constant.
     
  6. Oct 24, 2005 #5

    mathman

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    The exact geometry of fundamental particles is unknown. Assuming they are points is a useful approximation. String theory asserts they are actually small strings, but this idea has a long way to go.
     
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