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Ligo: tHE eLEPHANT GETS wHITER?

  1. Jan 4, 2008 #1
    ok guys maybe I missed something but this project looks more and more like a Hi Fi enthusiast tuning his kit with excited enthusiasm. But no music is heard.

    :devil: Ok so a few years or so I said this would fail through an error of priciple. LOL I no nothing compared to these guys.... so why no results after all these years???
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 4, 2008 #2

    wolram

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    They have yet to get to full sesitivity.

    Edit

    I think the last time i looked they gave a 10% chance of detection.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2008
  4. Jan 5, 2008 #3
    I give LIGO much better odds of detection in the next decade than SETI.
     
  5. Jan 5, 2008 #4

    wolram

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    LOL.
     
  6. Jan 5, 2008 #5

    wolram

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    On a serious note, the next generation (10 fold better) LIGO should answer many questions.
     
  7. Jan 18, 2008 #6
    Recently a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) was detected coming from the direction of the Andromeda galaxy. This is just the sort of event LIGO has been waiting 2 years for. The idea was that a collision of two massive bodies (possibly black holes) would be marked by a GRB and a gravity wave. LIGO did not detect a gravity wave and so they concluded that either the collision occured much further away than the Andromeda galaxy or that the GRB was originated by something other than a massive collision. It never crossed their minds for a nanosecond that the reason they did not detect any gravity waves during the GRB event (or the during the previous two years that LIGO has been operation), is that possibly gravity waves do not exist, in contradiction with theory of general relativity. I wonder if after another two years of no detection with ten fold sensitivity, will they start to question the existance of gravity waves? Probably not.
     
  8. Jan 18, 2008 #7

    wolram

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    When new LIGO is up and running there will be very little room for error, non detection would be a hard knock to take.
     
  9. Jan 19, 2008 #8

    Jorrie

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    It would be very exiting if one can have an observed event, proven to be inside the range of LIGO, that should produce detectable gravitational waves and LIGO 'sees' nothing! This could mean that the detection method is wrong, or that Einstein's GR is wrong, or some modeling of GR has been done wrongly. IMO, any of these would trigger big advances in the understanding of gravitation.
     
  10. Jan 19, 2008 #9
    And why should they? There is already indirect evidence that gravity waves do exist.
     
  11. Jan 19, 2008 #10

    wolram

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    Science should answer direct questions, one can prophesis all one wants that an apple is an onion.
     
  12. Jan 19, 2008 #11
    Yes, I agree. I was merely suggesting that we appear to be on the right track.
     
  13. Jan 19, 2008 #12
  14. Jan 19, 2008 #13

    Why did they spend billions of dollars building LIGO and plan to spend more millions of dollars upgrading it, if they are already so certain gravity waves exist?
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2008
  15. Jan 20, 2008 #14
    Why do we build telescopes when we're already so certain light waves exist?
     
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