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Linear mapping.

  1. May 26, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Let T: R2 -> R1 be given by T(x,y) = (y^2)x + (x^2)y.
    Is T linear? justify your answer


    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution

    Yes it is a linear mapping because both points map onto one point.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 26, 2009 #2
    a function f(x) is linear if

    f(ax) = a f(x) ; where "a" is some constant

    and f(x+y) = f(x) + f(y)

    see if your function satisfies these
     
  4. May 27, 2009 #3

    HallsofIvy

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    Staff Emeritus
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    This is very distressing. Just about everything you say here is wrong. There are not two points being mapped to one. The single point (x,y) in R2 is mapped to a single point in R1. But, in any case, that has NOTHING to do with being "linear". Please review the definition of "linear mapping". (It is basically what waht said.)
     
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