Linear Momentum and Collisions of meteor

In summary, a meteor with a mass of 10^8 kg struck the Earth with a speed of 11 km/s, causing the Earth to experience a recoil speed and a change in kinetic energy. The Earth's recoil speed can be calculated using the law of conservation of momentum, and the fraction of the meteor's kinetic energy that was transferred to the Earth can be determined by comparing the kinetic energies of both bodies before and after the collision. This collision is considered to be "completely inelastic" and the kinetic energy is not conserved.
  • #1
wildr0id
2
0
A meteor whose mass was about 10^8 kg struck the Earth (m = 6.0 X10^24 kg) with a speed of about 11 km/s and came to rest in the Earth.
(a) What was the Earth's recoil speed? (m/s)

(b) What fraction of the meteor's kinetic energy was transformed to kinetic energy of the Earth? (%)

(c) By how much did the Earth's kinetic energy change as a result of this collision? (J)

I know this problem requires a look at conservation of momentum and conservation of energy principles, but I am having trouble just trying to start this problem out
 
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  • #2
You know that u need to apply the law of conservation of momentum.Well,then do it...I'm afraid you're dealing with a plastic collision for which the KE is not really conserved...

Daniel.
 
  • #3
This is a "completely inelastic" collision- Kinetic energy is not conserved so you cannot use that.

You do, however, know that the Earth has 0 velocity initially and that both the Earth and the asteroid have the same velocity after.

Mava+ Meve= Mav'a+ Mev'e ("e" subscripts are "earth", "a" subscripts are "asteroid". v' is after the collision.) becomes Mav= (Ma+ Me)v'.

You know Ma, Me, and v. Solve for v'. Once you know that you can calculate the kinetic energy of the asteroid and Earth after the collision and compare it with those values before the collision.
 

Related to Linear Momentum and Collisions of meteor

1. What is linear momentum?

Linear momentum is a measure of an object's motion in a straight line. It is defined as the product of an object's mass and its velocity.

2. How is linear momentum conserved in a collision?

According to the law of conservation of momentum, the total momentum of a system remains constant in the absence of external forces. In a collision, the total momentum before and after the collision must be equal, meaning that the sum of the momenta of the objects involved remains the same.

3. What factors influence the amount of linear momentum in a meteor?

The amount of linear momentum in a meteor is influenced by its mass and velocity. A larger mass or higher velocity will result in a greater linear momentum.

4. How do elastic and inelastic collisions affect the linear momentum of a meteor?

In an elastic collision, the total linear momentum of the objects involved remains the same before and after the collision. In an inelastic collision, some of the kinetic energy is lost and the total linear momentum may change. However, the law of conservation of momentum still applies.

5. Can linear momentum be transferred between a meteor and other objects?

Yes, linear momentum can be transferred between a meteor and other objects through collisions or interactions. This transfer of momentum can result in changes in the motion of both the meteor and the other object.

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