Linux INstall

  • #26
graphic7
Gold Member
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2
franznietzsche said:
Getting ready to install, but i want to know how the rest of you have your partitions setup.

Also, what is the purpose of the swap file?

I need a / directory for the OS, obviously, /home or /usr for working in, graphic7 suggested a /boot, i'm assuming a backup of the / directory. Anything else?

Also what sizes are your directories respectively?
/usr should be the largest partition, next to /. /home should be whatever you think you need. /boot stores the bootloader configurations, as well as the kernel, itself (therefore, it shouldn't require hardly any space).

Given I had a 20gb for Fedora I would:

3gb - /home
10gb - /usr
6.5gb - /
500mb swap
50mb /boot
 
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  • #27
1,036
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All my computers are set up to multi-boot. I keep Windows in a primary C partition and Linux (or Linuxes) in logicals in the extended partitition. The one that has RedHat9 which I use for personal, a little business, and schoolwork I guess is a good guide for your Fedora. It has a 100mb /boot partition, about 7.4gb root (/) partition (I keep /usr on the root partition), 800mb /home and about 530mb swap. There's no problem having additional logical partitions on that extended partition, to be used by Windows, linux, or both (or neither, such as for ghost (backup) images.

I'm only actually using about 60% of that 7.4gb, even with quite a few packages installed. I keep /home in a separate partition on the theory that it's convenient for backing up, and to impose a little discipline on myself so I don't let too much crap accumulate. This way every so often I have to "clean house" to make room.

The swap space is used by linux to swap out memory. The rule of thumb for that seems to be about the size of your ram.
 
  • #28
graphic7
Gold Member
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Typically, splitting up some of the general / partitions like /usr and /var are all about the purpose of the system in question. If you're running a server, you'll probably want to keep /var around, given it contains log files, etc. On a workstation, you might have some binaries you compiled yourself that you might want to keep in which case, splitting up /usr would preserve those binaries.

If you don't see any immediate need to split up /usr, feel free not to. I've worked with quite a few UNIXs over the years, and splitting up /usr is just a general rule for me. Typically BSD-based OSs will have home directories on /usr, therefore, splitting it up would be advantageous. Most of my programs I compile from source on BSD-based OSs and Linux distributions go in /usr/local, which I like to preserve.
 
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  • #29
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5
Well I'm currently posting while running under Fedora, haven't tried booting to windows yet though.

I gave the root 5 Gb, same for boot, swap 1 Gb (i have 768 Mb of RAM) and about 40 to /home.

Up and running fine, though i need to find printer drivers, my printer wasn't listed in the list that came up at startup (not sure why)and the disc only has Mac and Windows drivers.
 
  • #30
508
1
hmm, the boot partition is only needed for the bootloader (grub) so it does not need much space, my boot partition is only 20 Mb. I think you could simply use three partitions on you Hd a /boot partition (20 Mb) a windows partition and a Linux partition.

When you start your system the following happens the bootloader on the boot partition (i.e. grub) is started when you then choose there which OS you want to start the kernel of either Linux or windows is tarted from one of the two other partitions.
 
  • #32
dduardo
Staff Emeritus
1,890
3
graphic7 said:
As I recall, Intel only offers their compilers in an RPM package install format. I could be wrong, but if this is true, then an RPM-based distribution like Fedora or SuSE will be your only choice. If you do choose to run, say a Debian-based package distribution, conversion utilities do exist to convert the RPM to the native package format, however, I would not put too much faith in those.
Gentoo's portage offers intel's compiler for both C++ and Fortran:

http://www.gentoo-portage.com/s?search=intel+compiler [Broken]
 
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  • #33
dduardo
Staff Emeritus
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franznietzsche said:
Well I'm currently posting while running under Fedora, haven't tried booting to windows yet though.

I gave the root 5 Gb, same for boot, swap 1 Gb (i have 768 Mb of RAM) and about 40 to /home.

Up and running fine, though i need to find printer drivers, my printer wasn't listed in the list that came up at startup (not sure why)and the disc only has Mac and Windows drivers.
I will have to agree with gerben and say that your boot parition is WAY too big. Mine is 32MB, but you could go smaller depending on how many kernel versions you keep around.
 
  • #34
graphic7
Gold Member
450
2
franznietzsche said:
Well I'm currently posting while running under Fedora, haven't tried booting to windows yet though.

I gave the root 5 Gb, same for boot, swap 1 Gb (i have 768 Mb of RAM) and about 40 to /home.

Up and running fine, though i need to find printer drivers, my printer wasn't listed in the list that came up at startup (not sure why)and the disc only has Mac and Windows drivers.
You won't find any printer drivers for UNIX/Linux on the CD or the manufacturer's site. Find out if the printer is a 'Postscript' printer. If this is true, getting it supported by LPD or Cups will be a simple matter. As I recall, there's a KDE app that configures Cups. You could go ahead and attempt to configure it using this app, and see if the printer is on the list.

Not all printers are Postscript. I bought a printer made in 94' or 95' by Lexmark; it upon non-Postscript and relied about the Windows GDI. Neither Cups or LPD supported it.
 
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  • #35
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6
When you were configuring your printer you did switch from "generic" to the company of your printer right?
 
  • #36
graphic7
Gold Member
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mattmns said:
When you were configuring your printer you did switch from "generic" to the company of your printer right?
You misunderstand. LPD and CUPS both depend on the printer being Postscript-capable. If it's not, the printer is not supported, regardless.
 
  • #37
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mattmns said:
When you were configuring your printer you did switch from "generic" to the company of your printer right?

yeah, but the model number is not listed as a choice.
 
  • #38
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5
I'm having a problem with glibc-devel, specifically /usr/lib/crt1.o which seems to be missing and is preventing me from running the intel compiler. How do i fix this? I've found posts from people with this problem all over hte place, but haven't found a solution.
 
  • #39
graphic7
Gold Member
450
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franznietzsche said:
I'm having a problem with glibc-devel, specifically /usr/lib/crt1.o which seems to be missing and is preventing me from running the intel compiler. How do i fix this? I've found posts from people with this problem all over hte place, but haven't found a solution.
Do a 'find / -name crt1.o' from a shell, and post your output. You could also verify that crt1.o is in /usr/lib.

Take a look at the release notes:

http://neumann.cem.msu.edu/docs/icc/C++ReleaseNotes.htm

There's an insert about the 'crt1.o' error you are encountering. If your error message looks similar to that, modifying your LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable will be trivial.
 
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  • #40
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[]$ ifort hw1c.f90
ld: /usr/lib/crt1.o: No such file: No such file or directory
[]$ find -name crt1.o
[]$

It doesn't disply anything when i enter the find command, jsut brings up another prompt.

ONly thing i've found online is that this has to do with a problem with the gnu library, but fixing that seems to be very difficult.
 
  • #41
graphic7
Gold Member
450
2
franznietzsche said:
[]$ ifort hw1c.f90
ld: /usr/lib/crt1.o: No such file: No such file or directory
[]$ find -name crt1.o
[]$

It doesn't disply anything when i enter the find command, jsut brings up another prompt.

ONly thing i've found online is that this has to do with a problem with the gnu library, but fixing that seems to be very difficult.
Did you do a full Fedora install?

This shouldn't be difficult at all. If you didn't do an install it's a matter of 1) installing the glibc-devel rpm and 2) setting the correct LD_LIBRARY_PATH. Both of these are trivial.
 
  • #42
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graphic7 said:
Did you do a full Fedora install?

This shouldn't be difficult at all. If you didn't do an install it's a matter of 1) installing the glibc-devel rpm and 2) setting the correct LD_LIBRARY_PATH. Both of these are trivial.

I tried installing the glibc-devel rpm, but the the entire glibc is missing.

And it may be trivial, but i still don't know how to do it
 
  • #43
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The only thing i can think of is that there is something wrong with the GNU library on Fedora. I can't find a solution for this problem anywhere, i tried reinstalling, made sure that glibc was included, and the probelm is still there. Every other report i've found of this problem has been running fedora.

Any ideas?
 
  • #44
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5
I looked in the install.log and found that

glib-devel-1.2.10-15.x86_64.rpm
glibc-devel-2.3.3-74.i386.rpm
glibc-profile-2.3.3-74.x86_64.rpm
glibc-utils-2.3.3-74.x86_64.rpm

Were all NOT installed.

glibc-2.3.3-74.i686
glibc-2.3.3-74.x86_64

Were installed
 
  • #45
1,414
5
I checked the MD5 checksum on the isos to be sure they matched(it did). However, when i booted from the fedora disc, it failed the media check. Could this be related? Why would the MD5 match when the media check failed though?
 
  • #46
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1
glibc-2.3.3-74.i686
glibc-2.3.3-74.x86_64

Were installed
Shouldn't it be one or the other?
 
  • #47
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5
gnome said:
Shouldn't it be one or the other?

I would think so, but thats what the install.log said.

I'm running yum update right now, i'm hoping that maybe that will fix the problem, it listed all the glibc files (glibc, glibc-devel, glibc-common) that i was apparently missing.
 
  • #48
dduardo
Staff Emeritus
1,890
3
Arrr. This is exactly why I like emerge. It is just better at installing and keeping track of software. I just installed suse 9.2 on someones computer because they got pentrated for NOT CHANGING DEFAULT PASSWORDS. Actually it was partially my fault for forgetting to disable root login through ssh, but anyway. They previosly ran gentoo. The first thing that they complain to me about is how bad installing programs is. Even for myself it was a pain in the butt to install stuff. So know they are going back to gentoo.

The moral of the story:
If you had installed gentoo and typed: emerge icc, you would have been done a long time ago.
 
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  • #49
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5
dduardo said:
Arrr. This is exactly why I like emerge. It is just better at installing and keeping track of software. I just installed suse 9.2 on someones computer because they got pentrated for NOT CHANGING DEFAULT PASSWORDS. Actually it was partially my fault for forgetting to disable root login through ssh, but anyway. They previosly ran gentoo. The first thing that they complain to me about is how bad installing programs is. Even for myself it was a pain in the butt to install stuff. So know they are going back to gentoo.

The moral of the story:
If you had installed gentoo and typed: emerge icc, you would have been done a long time ago.

Yeah, but oh well. Its working now, so no worries. Thanx for the input and help everyone.
 

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