Lipschitz Continuity and Uniqueness

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Dear all,

If a differential equation is Lipschitz continuous, then the solution is unique. But what about the implication in the other direction? I know that uniqueness does not imply Lipschitz continuity. But is there a counterexample? A differential equation that is not L-continuous, still the solution is unique?
I would really like to know the answer to this question.
Thank you all for your help,

Hendrik
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Now I have found an answer to my question:

[URL]http://archive.numdam.org/ARCHIVE/AFST/
AFST_1996_6_5_4/AFST_1996_6_5_4_577_0/
AFST_1996_6_5_4_577_0.pdf[/url]

or, rather, Bernis and Qwang have found an answer. However, my differential equation is only of first degree, like

\dot K(t) = F(K(t))

One example would be F(K) = K^\alpha with 0 < \alpha < 1, then you get multiple solutions if you start from K = 0. But that's not surprising, because the differential equation is not Lipschitz continuous in K = 0. My question now would be: Is it possible to have a unique solution even if F were L-continuous in 0?

Thanks, many greetings,
Hendrik
 
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