Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

I Liquid neon bubble chamber

  1. Jan 3, 2018 #1
    Is liquid neon popular for bubble chamber detectors?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 3, 2018 #2

    jtbell

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    "Is?" Are bubble chambers still a thing? :wideeyed:

    I don't have any statistics on how popular neon was as a bubble-chamber medium, but I can provide one data point. My dissertation was based on an experiment which studied ##\bar \nu_\mu## interactions in the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber which was (for that experiment, in the late 1970s) filled with a mixture of 64% neon and 36% hydrogen (by number of atoms).
     
  4. Jan 4, 2018 #3
    Actually, there's a bubble chamber in use at JLAB. It is filled with super-heated Nitrous Oxide It uses ~8 MeV photons produced at the injector for CEBAF to study the photo-disintegration of oxygen into helium and carbon. This is the inverse of the astrophysical process of Helium-Carbon fusion to Oxygen. Data is taken by a 100 frames/sec digital camera and a microphone to record the 'pings' of the bubbles.

    https://wiki.jlab.org/ciswiki/index.php/Bubble_Chamber

    https://wiki.jlab.org/ciswiki/images/6/6a/Bubble_OpenHouse_April2016.pdf
     
  5. Jan 4, 2018 #4
    Hydrogen and neon are good for their separate purposes.
    Liquid protium bubble chamber is a detector which contains only lone nucleons, and no nuclei. That´s not the case with any other device - fog chamber (unless it´s hydrogen near its condensation point...), photographic emulsion, CCD - all of them contain nuclei. Liquid protium does not. Every interaction is with a lone proton, or spontaneous decay. Correct?
     
  6. Jan 4, 2018 #5

    jtbell

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    One can also have interactions with the electrons that accompany the protons in neutral hydrogen. Slide 16 of this presentation shows the bubble-chamber photograph on which weak neutral-current scattering of a (anti)neutrino from an electron was first observed in the early 1970s. This is ##\bar \nu_\mu e \rightarrow \bar \nu_\mu e## via an intermediate virtual ##Z^0##. The signature is a single outgoing electron track appearing all by itself, the "incoming" atomic electron and the incoming and outgoing neutrinos being invisible.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2018
  7. Jan 5, 2018 #6
    Yes - there will always be electrons in target.
    Bubble chamber and cloud chamber are the two types of detectors that could possibly consist of a pure element, so you might ensure that there is a single type of target around.
    The stable pure elements with low boiling point are as follows:
    1. H2 - 20K/-253C
    2. He - 4K/-269C
    3. N2 - 77K/-196C
    4. O2 - 90K/-183C
    5. F2 - 85K/-188C
    6. Ne - 27K/-246C
    7. Cl2 - 239K/-34C
    8. Ar - 87K/-186C
    9. Br2 - 332K/59C
    10. Kr - 120K/-153C
    11. Xe - 165K/-108C
     
  8. Jan 5, 2018 #7

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2017 Award

    1. HPGE
    2. Silicon
    3. Transition Edge Sensor (for superconducting elements)
     
  9. Jan 5, 2018 #8

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2017 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    4. Time projection chambers, drift chambers and similar gas detectors if we ignore the electrodes and readout electronics (but bubble chambers and cloud chambers need some support structure as well). You typically don't run them with a single gas but it would not be completely impossible.
     
  10. Jan 6, 2018 #9

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2017 Award

    And why you don't typically run gas TPCs with single elements, you do with liquid TPCs, typically Argon and Xenon. I think there may have been a few small Krypton ones, despite Krypton being far from ideal.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted