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Liquid To solid

  1. Apr 28, 2011 #1
    Name a substance that will change from liquid state to solid state on heating.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 28, 2011 #2
    And remaining chemically unchanged? Nothing does that.

    You could have your ceramics which change from a liquid structure to a solid structure, but that's with the formation of bonds on heating and all that.
     
  4. Apr 28, 2011 #3

    tiny-tim

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    eggy-weggy :biggrin:
     
  5. Apr 28, 2011 #4

    QuantumPion

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    The first thing that came to my mind was concrete, but that is a chemical reaction and doesn't really count.

    Is it possible for some sort of solid solution to have a liquid phase at a lower temperature than a solid phase? E.g. one component of the solution precipitates out with increasing temperature while the other component turns to liquid?
     
  6. Apr 28, 2011 #5

    Mapes

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    It is possible, even for reversible transformations. It's only required that the high-temperature phase (the solid) has a higher entropy than the low-temperature phase (the liquid). As you can imagine, this is pretty unusual. I seem to remember that it's been demonstrated in some carefully designed polymer systems, though. Will look to see if I can find the details.
     
  7. Apr 28, 2011 #6

    DaveC426913

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    You read my mind. :biggrin:
     
  8. Apr 29, 2011 #7
    Changes chemically :)
     
  9. Apr 29, 2011 #8

    Andy Resnick

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    Like!
     
  10. May 2, 2011 #9

    Mapes

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    Ah, I found it: Plazanet et al., "Freezing on heating of liquid solutions," J Chem Phys 121:5031 p5031 (2004), discussed here. But a look at the subsequent literature indicates that the physics is still being worked out.
     
  11. May 2, 2011 #10

    QuantumPion

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    Interesting, although it sounds like that is still just a chemical reaction, although notably a reversible one.
     
  12. May 2, 2011 #11

    Mapes

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    Right, or put another way, a multi-component system (with additional factors such as mutual solubility) rather than a single-component system.
     
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