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Literature Resources

  1. Sep 6, 2005 #1

    loseyourname

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    I have some decent links that are worth sharing.

    First off, the Perseus Project is an absolute must-have. You can read the classics in both English translation and in their original Greek, Latin, Sanksrit, or Arabic. The site also includes online versions of many popular lexicons.

    http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/

    The Online Medieval and Classical Literature Library from Berkeley:

    http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/OMACL/

    Which links to another favorite site of mine, the University of Virginia e-text library:

    http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/

    From this site comes this page, which has links to collections of western European literature by language:

    http://www.lib.virginia.edu/wess/etexts.html

    Including my personal favorite, CELT, where you can find many Old Irish texts in English translation and many more in their original Old Irish (there are also some Irish texts in Latin):

    http://www.ucc.ie/celt/index.html

    A searchable New Testament, in Koine Greek:

    http://www.greekbible.com/

    The entire King James Bible, in English, from UVa:

    http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/kjv.browse.html

    The definitive Beowulf page, with the full text in Old English and Modern English, with maps and images, fully annotated (you can find a more basic version at any number of sites also linked to here):

    http://www.heorot.dk/

    Another good resource for anyone reading Beowulf is this thread from the Tolkein Online forums. The thread starter is an Old English scholar that is very helpful, and though the thread never really took off, you could always revive and learn a lot from this guy. On a side note, the One Ring forums are actually a pretty good resource in and of themselves. While there are plenty of Tolkein geeks that don't know the first thing about literature outside of fantasy registered there, there are also some very intelligent and scholarly people who are well-versed on medieval literature. Of course, if you are a Tolkein geek and want to learn some Elvish, there is no better place to start than their language forum.

    The Internet Sacred Text Archive:

    http://www.sacred-texts.com/index.htm

    And, of course, the indispensable Project Gutenberg:

    http://www.gutenberg.org/

    If anybody is interested in constructed languages, both fictional and those designed to be used, this is a great resource, with links to every artificial language imaginable:

    http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/9219/conlib.html

    Also, the archives of the CONLANG mailing list:

    http://listserv.brown.edu/archives/conlang.html
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2005
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  3. Sep 6, 2005 #2

    honestrosewater

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    Some of my bookmarks:

    http://www.bartleby.com/
    Great general resource. They publish lots of public domain literature and reference material. Some especially useful ones for this forum:

    http://www.bartleby.com/67/
    The Encyclopedia of World History

    http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/
    The Cambridge History of English and American Literature

    http://www.sparknotes.com/
    Another general site for history and literature study guides.
    http://www.sparknotes.com/home/histbio/
    http://www.sparknotes.com/home/english/

    http://www.pinkmonkey.com/index2.asp
    Another one with study guides, book notes, etc.

    http://www.umich.edu/~umfandsf/symbolismproject/symbolism.html/
    A dictionary of symbolism. For instance, the entry for 'rose'
    "In mythology, the first red roses are said to have arisen from the BLOOD of Adonis for the love of Aphrodite; thus, they have become symbolic of love, and often resurrection. In Christian symbolism, the RED rose stands for the blood shed by Jesus on the CROSS; it has also become a symbol for earthly love, a tradition which continues today. The rose may represent the Virgin Mary, and thus virginity, or fertility and passion. It is beauty and perfection, happiness and grace, yet it is also sensuality and seduction."

    http://www.jcsm.org/StudyCenter/kjvstrongs/STRINDEX.htm
    Strong's Hebrew and Greek Dictionaries. Comes in handy when doing Biblical or Ancient Greek Language or Mythology research.

    http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/
    The Online Books Page

    http://www.yuni.com/library/latin.html
    Latin Quotes and Phrases

    Some of the better Greek Mythology sites:
    http://homepage.mac.com/cparada/GML/index.html (my favorite)
    http://www.theoi.com/index.htm
    http://www.pantheon.org/

    http://www.artrenewal.org/
    One of the best sites for high-quality images of paintings and visual arts (click on Museum).

    http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/
    "The LoveToKnow Free Online Encyclopedia is based on what many consider to be the best encyclopedia ever written: the eleventh edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica, first published in 1911."

    Helpful law and government sites (World and US):
    http://www.law.cornell.edu/
    http://www.law.cornell.edu/world/ (world)
    http://lp.findlaw.com/
    http://www.loc.gov/law/guide/nations.html (world)
    http://www.gpoaccess.gov/index.html
    And for the US Constituion, a good place to start:
    http://www.gpoaccess.gov/constitution/browse.html
     
  4. Sep 7, 2005 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    On this page in post #20 [ the Humanties section] you will find a few anomalous subjects that may be of interest.

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=58374&page=2

    Please feel free to post subjects as described in the original post for that thread.
     
  5. Sep 12, 2005 #4

    loseyourname

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  6. Sep 16, 2005 #5
    A nice resource for all known languages, real or invented

    www.omniglot.com
     
  7. Sep 18, 2005 #6

    Evo

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    Last edited: Sep 18, 2005
  8. Oct 8, 2005 #7

    marcus

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    For translations of European verse from some 8 centuries and over a dozen languages, what seems like a fairly new or littleknown UK site
    http://www.brindin.com/main.htm

    Work by over a dozen skilled verse translators is featured. Of particular interest to me is the fact that lyric form is occasionally carried over from the original verse---so that elements of rhythm and rhyme appear in Brindin translations.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2005
  9. Oct 9, 2005 #8

    Evo

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  10. Dec 3, 2005 #9

    Evo

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  11. Jan 20, 2006 #10

    Evo

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    If you are interested in linguistic phenomena and devices, this page on wiki is a great resource, not only does it list schemes and tropes, but it gives a short difinition along with a link to a more detailed description. Nice.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figure_of_speech
     
  12. Aug 26, 2006 #11

    Astronuc

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    http://www.americanantiquarian.org/

    This is pretty cool! :cool:

    http://www.americanantiquarian.org/history.htm
     
  13. Mar 7, 2007 #12

    Astronuc

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  14. Mar 25, 2008 #13

    Astronuc

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  15. Mar 29, 2008 #14

    Astronuc

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    May 7, 1996
    Mummies, Textiles Offer Evidence Of Europeans in Far East
    By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    which led me to a great (but expensive) book.

    The Cambridge History of Early Inner Asia (Hardcover)
    http://www.amazon.com/Cambridge-History-Early-Inner-Asia/dp/0521243041

    There's a short section on the Scythians, and Scythians is a term used for the Goths.
     
  16. Sep 17, 2009 #15

    Astronuc

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    Last night, I attended a presentation by David Andelman about his new book, "A Shattered Peace: Versailles 1919 and the Price We Pay Today". Chapter 9½, which is not in the book, is available on-line.

    http://www.ashatteredpeace.com/chapter9.html

    http://www.ashatteredpeace.com/bio.html
    He's a really nice guy.

    Andelman is one of many students of Ernest May at Harvard.

    Unfortunately, May passed away in June.
    http://www.hks.harvard.edu/news-events/news/articles/ernest-may-obituary-june09
     
  17. Mar 3, 2010 #16
  18. Jul 10, 2010 #17

    Astronuc

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    Last edited: Jul 10, 2010
  19. Jul 10, 2010 #18

    arildno

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  20. Jul 10, 2010 #19

    arildno

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  21. Jul 10, 2010 #20

    arildno

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