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Living inside of a black hole

  1. Dec 4, 2011 #1
    I've always wondered about this....if one sun over a certain size is enough (at the end of it's life) to become a black hole, then at the big bang, ALL the matter in the universe was in a very small space...so my question is why wasn't the big bang enough to actually create a black hole itself? Or maybe the big bang could be not a "big bang", but instead matter streaming into a black hole in a different universe and creating ours as it entered...

    I have no idea, and I'm no scientist, but I am extremely fascinated by cosmology. I'm very open and eager to read answers to this - many thanks in advance
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 4, 2011 #2
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=494036

    tl;dr, the universe didn't happen inside another universe.


    Additionally, a black hole would probably require a more defined separation between gravity and the other forces, while most models suggest there was little if any such difference, with many models suggesting that all four forces become a single superforce at extremely high temperatures/energy densities.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  4. Dec 4, 2011 #3
    The way I think of it is this. Whether this is right or not I dunno.

    At the big bang the universe was packed with extreme density. But it appears that the distribution of the mass was almost homogenous, that is, there was almost exactly as much mass at point A as at point B. So gravity almost cancels out everywhere.

    Another way to look at it is to have a black hole you have to have some place with less gravity than there is in the black hole. In the early Universe there was no such thing. There was no empty space whatsoever for a long time.

    Now I said gravity almost cancels out. So there could be black holes left over from the old days from regions that had a little bit more density. A search is in progress, no luck as yet.
     
  5. Dec 5, 2011 #4

    Chronos

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    Extremely overdense regions in the very early universe would have stood out like a sore thumb in WMAP.
     
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