Living with Diagnosed Condition: A Discussion

In summary: ADHD looks like in adults. (I haven't read much about it other than the general gist that it's a type of disorder.) Thanks for tracking this down, Moonbear. I read it, but am more interested in descriptions of what... specifically ADHD looks like in adults. (I haven't read much about it other than the general gist that it's a type of disorder.)
  • #1
limitapproaches0
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0
so how many other people on this board have been diagnosed with such condition? (blank stare for 5 minutes) ok. please reply
 
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  • #2
limitapproaches0 said:
so how many other people on this board have been diagnosed with such condition? (blank stare for 5 minutes) ok. please reply
Not me, but I'm interested in this sort of thing. How old are you, and when were you diagnosed? What seems to be the main symptom, or thing that lead you to a doctor?
 
  • #3
limitapproaches0 said:
so how many other people on this board have been diagnosed with such condition? (blank stare for 5 minutes) ok. please reply
Count me in, although I wasn't diagnosed until I was 46. 150mg of Wellbutrin in the morning and 20mg of Citalopram at night seems to be doing a good job.
 
  • #4
Danger said:
Count me in, although I wasn't diagnosed until I was 46. 150mg of Wellbutrin in the morning and 20mg of Citalopram at night seems to be doing a good job.
46! That's very late for any kind of psych dx. Do you know the exact classification they've given you? I'm recalling there's some specific adult version.
 
  • #5
zoobyshoe said:
46! That's very late for any kind of psych dx. Do you know the exact classification they've given you? I'm recalling there's some specific adult version.
It was more of a self-diagnosis based upon several different symptoms, which I then consulted my doctor about. He agreed, and started me on the medication. The perscription has changed a bit since then, since the first couple of incarnations lost effectiveness after a while (first 150mg Wellbutrin, then 150 morning and 75 night). I suspect that the seratonin must be the primary instigator, since the Citalopram is SSRI as opposed to the broad-band Wellbutrin and seems to make the difference. As for it being an adult version, I've had a lot of the symptoms since my early teens. I don't even know if the condition had been discovered at that time.
 
  • #6
Danger said:
It was more of a self-diagnosis based upon several different symptoms, which I then consulted my doctor about. He agreed, and started me on the medication.
What kind of doc was this, a GP or a shrink? I know that GPs can prescribe all the same medications.
Danger said:
As for it being an adult version, I've had a lot of the symptoms since my early teens. I don't even know if the condition had been discovered at that time.
No, you're right, it wasn't.

Looking in my copy of the DSM-IV, I find only Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. I'm not clear if that means one has to have both some kind of inability to pay attention and hyperactivity, or if you can get the dx from having either symptom.

What was it that lead you to start wondering about such a diagnosis for yourself?
 
  • #7
zoobyshoe said:
What kind of doc was this, a GP or a shrink? I know that GPs can prescribe all the same medications.

What was it that lead you to start wondering about such a diagnosis for yourself?
It was my GP. I don't mind discussing this with you, but some of it's a bit touchy, so if you don't mind I'd prefer to continue this on PM. :smile:
 
  • #8
No problem.
 
  • #9
zoobyshoe said:
46! That's very late for any kind of psych dx. Do you know the exact classification they've given you? I'm recalling there's some specific adult version.

There are quite a lot of adults being diagnosed with ADD or ADHD. Usually, they've had the symptoms all their lives, but just were never diagnosed for one reason or another.

I think there was a thread in the biology forum on this a while ago. I don't recall if it was a particularly informative thread or not, but I'll see if I can find it.

Edit: Found the thread, though it was a rather short-lived one; I must have discussed the topic somewhere else, because this isn't quite what I was remembering. https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=21820
 
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  • #10
As far as I know, I've never met anyone with this dx, and it is a blank page in my understanding. The hyperactivity aspects they describe in the DSM sound very similar to hypomania. I'm wondering how they distinguish.
 
  • #13
Mouse giggles?
 
  • #14
zoobyshoe said:
Mouse giggles?

Actually, it was more the one that was related to Theory Development and mentioned Attention Deficit Syndrome. I didn't open it to see the context, it just struck me as funny reading it in the search results.
 
  • #15
Moonbear said:
Edit: Found the thread, though it was a rather short-lived one; I must have discussed the topic somewhere else, because this isn't quite what I was remembering. https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=21820
Thanks for tracking this down, Moonbear. I read it, but am more interested in descriptions of what someone with this condition are like, or what it is like to be someone with this condition.
 
  • #16
Real inattentives and hyperactives - what they are like

zoobyshoe said:
I [...] am more interested in descriptions of what someone with this condition are like, or what it is like to be someone with this condition.
It depends if the person in question is inattentive-type or hyperactive-type.

The hyperactive type runs like a motor, reacts quickly to stimulation and does not attend to tasks very well. ("Poor impulse control" describes this person well.) This is easier to understand if one remembers the heuristic that 60% of the brain is there to inhibit the other 40%, that this inhibition circuitry requires power and that the hyperactive's inhibition circuitry is underpowered. If a hyperactive's inhibition circuitry is powered up with amphetamines, he tends to appear normal.

The inattentive type frequently misses relevant environmental information (for example, social cues), reacts slowly to stimulation and has trouble filtering out irrelevant environmental stimulation. Off-topic aural and visual streaming to this person is like kryptonite to superman. When there is distracting noise or visuals, he literally cannot think about anything except, moment by moment, the action in the distracting information streams. It is hard for this person to carry on a conversation or study or read in a cafe or a crowded party. The inattentive has underpowered brain circuitry that deals with filtering of incoming information. His reticular activating system may also be underpowered, resulting in his typical sluggish thinking speed (sluggish relative to IQ -- the IQ curves for both hyperactives and inattentives are typical in both means and distributions).

The inattentive is perhaps best described by the main character in the movie Memento, especially in the scene where the female lead (a sociopath played by Carrie Ann Moss) tells him she is going to use him and exits the house, he frantically tries to find pens/pencils to write down what just happened (she had hidden the pens on purpose, knowing he needs to write in order to remember anything), and she then distracts him by barging back in pretending to be crying which makes him forget what she just told him. The real inattentive is not as extremely distactable and forgetful in terms of quantity as the Memento character, but the description fits in terms of quality.
 
  • #17
Wow! Thanks hitssquad. Excellent.

As with a lot of things that probably shouldn't be in the DSM both types seem to be essentially neurological, and the one is probably a completely different problem than the other. They seem to have been lumped together by the superficial similarity of having a deleterious effect on attention.

I will check for Memento next time I'm on a film watching binge.

Thanks.
 
  • #18
I often suspect I have ADD. I then took this test which said I exhibited severe symptoms and should consult a doctor. I erm, havn't got round to doing it yet :(
 
  • #19
they told me i had it and i took wellbutrin for a while but it made my liver produce too much of something or other.
 
  • #20
My children have ADD and my son is more likely ADHD. We had tests done, which pretty much confirmed it, particular my son. Both take Concerta.

I have ADD (some combination of the hyperactive and inattentitive about which hitssquad posted). I was tested after my kids, which happened about 4 years ago. I don't take medication, unless one considers the fact that I consume large quantities of coffee.

My father has it, and his father and probably his farther's father had it. It seems to run through the males on my father's side of the family.

In my case, I probably self-medicated with caffeine. I can remember sitting in class during elementary and high school - and not being able to sit still. Reading literature was difficult if I was not interested in the story - but math and science were easy. I can multi-task - I used to eat, watch TV and do homework. I always needed background noise to concentrate - total quiet was very distracting for me.

I occasionally had EEG's done, and the results apparently interested the various doctors who read them, but no one could explain why - only that the brain waves were different.

As for processing relevant or irrelevant information, I would have to think about that. In my line of work, I collect seemingly irrelevant information, but eventually it may prove useful. Some of my colleagues are amazed at how I can remember journal articles or obscure bits of information, which are relevant to a particular technical matter. I see things that everyone else overlooks, but to me are very obvious. On the other hand, I do sometimes miss social cues, and my wife hates it when I 'phase out'.
 
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  • #21
Are you, yourself, aware somehow, that you are "phasing out"? What would the difference be between that and really concentrating hard on something to the exclusion of your surroundings?
 
  • #23
dextercioby said:
Alright.What's ADD...?
Attention Defecit Disorder. ADHD = Attention Defecit Hyperactivity Disorder.
 
  • #24
Thank you.I think i don't have it.Not yet,at least.

Daniel.
 
  • #25
Well I was diagnosed at 16 after years of school problems. The thing everybody knew was that if I was interested in something I learned every fact of it and could do it. but more often the case in my formal schooling was that I could not gain interest in what I was learning. I couldn't pay attention and was often the kid you may remember from school that would be in another planet daydreaming or doing something stupid like jumping around throwing things, etc. However I was diagnosed at 16, yes I know this is late but I went to a private school most of my life so my condition may have been overlooked. I was put on a medication called concerta which was really an aggressive treatment for my problem. this drug pulled me from being the typical teenage boy that didnt care about school to top of my class mr perfect material. anyways i took it all 11th grade and part of 12th until I started really battling the side effects as my dose was increased. i did not talk to anyone, i felt paranoid and delusional, i had no sex drive, i was flipping out on people so I quit taking it. I m now just finishing up my 1st year of colllege and realize the need for it. i may consider it but i know i m capable of a lot more than what i m achieving rite now,( my biggest problem is time management and studying at all) i feel that if i studyed regularly i would be better off but due to my condition it is very easy to get distracted to other things.
 
  • #26
That happens alot: the side effects of a med become worse than the original condition. Usually, though, there are other meds to try.
 
  • #27
zoobyshoe said:
Are you, yourself, aware somehow, that you are "phasing out"? What would the difference be between that and really concentrating hard on something to the exclusion of your surroundings?
Sometimes I am aware just after it happens.

It is just like really concentrating hard on something to the exclusion of your surroundings. I can concentrate really hard on something while listening to rock and roll music.

I am the consummate absent-minded professor, of which my wife likes to remind me.

Reading comprehension tests (like on the SAT) were difficult for me, because I couldn't keep my mind on the subject(especially if it was uninteresting), and I would have to read over 2, 3, or more times (and I would just sit there and think "arrgghh, this stuff is stupid). The quiet environment of the test room was distracting (I felt like screaming), because I would usually be listening to music or TV when studying - and I would interrupt my study to go do something else - like make a snack or go outside.

ADD is believed to be some kind of hereditary advantage, which I certainly don't understand (it's been a royal pain). Perhaps it was useful a few hundred or thousand years ago as a survival mechanism. I seem to have an advantage in sparring (martial arts), especially when the action is fast. However, there is not much practical advantage to being proficient in hand-to-hand combat in civilized society. :biggrin:
 
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  • #28
See, I do that concentrating so hard on one thing that things in the environment are neglected. I am sure it's not ADD, though. It seems only to crop up during times of high stress. I often sit at intersections waiting for the stop sign to change.
 
  • #29
zoobyshoe said:
See, I do that concentrating so hard on one thing that things in the environment are neglected. I am sure it's not ADD, though. It seems only to crop up during times of high stress. I often sit at intersections waiting for the stop sign to change.
It may be related. ADD has to do with a certain part of the brain that requires stimulation of a particular region of the cerebral cortex.

In my case, stress is not necessarily a factor, and in some cases, I focus better under stress.
 
  • #30
Astronuc said:
In my case, I probably self-medicated with caffeine. I can remember sitting in class during elementary and high school - and not being able to sit still. Reading literature was difficult if I was not interested in the story - but math and science were easy. I can multi-task - I used to eat, watch TV and do homework. I always needed background noise to concentrate - total quiet was very distracting for me.

This describes me perfectly. I have a hard time focusing on just one topic. If I'm not juggling 6 projects at once, I get bored and lose focus. I don't know if anyone would diagnose me with ADD, I have never sought to have it checked out, because I can't see any reason to do anything about it. To me, the traits people describe in ADD (as opposed to ADHD, where the hyperactivity can be problematic and disruptive socially) sound like good things, at least in a highly stressful academic world where you do need to juggle multiple things all at once. Where I depart from the "classic" definitions of ADD is that I do go back and finish my projects, it just takes a while because I don't just start one thing and follow it through to the end, I start many things and when I get tired of one, do another, but eventually get back around to finishing them all. I think it becomes something that requires treatment when you aren't able to complete projects. I also think people find ways to compensate if given the opportunity. For example, I always think best on my feet, literally. If you want me to give something a lot of thought, sitting in a chair or at a desk is not the place for me to do it. I take a walk, or pace the floor, or stand at a whiteboard. In school, I was the one who was always fidgeting.

As for processing relevant or irrelevant information, I would have to think about that. In my line of work, I collect seemingly irrelevant information, but eventually it may prove useful. Some of my colleagues are amazed at how I can remember journal articles or obscure bits of information, which are relevant to a particular technical matter. I see things that everyone else overlooks, but to me are very obvious. On the other hand, I do sometimes miss social cues, and my wife hates it when I 'phase out'.

I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of scientists could be diagnosed with ADD. The ability to store information that seems irrelevant at the time and recall it when it suddenly becomes relevant is pretty important for scientific creativity. It also comes in handy to be able to multi-task. You have to keep track of all the student projects in the lab, your teaching responsibilities, committee meetings and other administrative tasks, tracking your grant budgets, reading and writing. It's a lot to juggle, but it's very appealing to the person who needs to juggle a lot of things to stay focused. When it becomes too extreme, then it becomes a problem.
 
  • #31
i recall reading somewhere that Einstein, walt disney, alexander graham bell, and marie curie all had ADD
 
  • #32
i have no idea how you can tell... and my parents don't really believe in that stuff... so i won't likely get tested. some people say, if i do have it, it obviously hasn' effected my schooling, but i dunno. i find it really hard to concentrate on anything unless its difficult but straight forward. meaning, i need to focus or i don't understand, but its straightforward enough that i can understand easily once I'm focussed.. like, paying attention is immediately rewarding... unlike history or something, where if you pay attention, you gain understanding slowly and blah blah... i just can't focuss on that stuff. even science. If someone starts explaining something in detail scientifically, i just can't pay attention. i don't know if that's add, but i sit there in my atro class, and even though the subject is interesting, i can just stare at the prof and quite literally hear nothing...

i'm also a hard core fidgetter and all that other stuff... but my mum always said i couldn't possibly have add, because i can read for hours on end. and add kids can't do that i guess? i dunno. also, everyone thinks I'm smart... and add kids tend not to be er... gifted i guess?

my brother was diagnosed though, and my parents wouldn't let him take meds... I'm wondering if they'd help him in school though, cause he's doing pretty poorly... i also wonder if they'd help me... i think i'd be the coolest thing ever if i actually like... was... like limitapproaches0... i think I'm like that... maybe?
 
  • #33
I wonder where ADD ends and plain lack of interest begins. Not applying yourself to stuff you're not interested in, especially if you're convinced it's ultimately unimportant, might be mistaken for ADD, especially if a person isn't too cowed by authority.
 
  • #34
I was given the same test that my son had. I apparently have ADD, but I have adapted.

My son has ADHD, and if he is not medicated, his behavior is pretty difficult to deal with, and he can be socially disruptive. It seems worse in boys than girls, and it seems to go in the male side of my family.

My daughter has a milder case, more ADD. She took Welbutrin until she had a seizure, and that is when she and my son began taking Concerta.

I am hoping that we can wean them off the medication, ASAP.
 
  • #35
zoobyshoe said:
I wonder where ADD ends and plain lack of interest begins. Not applying yourself to stuff you're not interested in, especially if you're convinced it's ultimately unimportant, might be mistaken for ADD, especially if a person isn't too cowed by authority.

oh well, maybe I'm just that then... though there are plenty of things i find interesting but still cannot pay attention to... and plenty of very very uninteresting things that i can stare at for a while and be entirely amused... its definately a hazy line i think... all those mental, or psychological disorders are really... hazy... why can't ADD just be fixed by therapy eh? or do psychologists make more by making deals with drug companies than they would if they "treated" someone for a few years...
 

Related to Living with Diagnosed Condition: A Discussion

1. What is the impact of a diagnosed condition on daily life?

Living with a diagnosed condition can have a significant impact on daily life, as it may require changes in daily routines, medications, and lifestyle choices. It can also affect emotional and mental well-being, relationships, and work or school performance.

2. How can one cope with the challenges of living with a diagnosed condition?

There are various ways to cope with the challenges of living with a diagnosed condition, including seeking support from loved ones, joining support groups, practicing self-care and mindfulness, and working closely with healthcare professionals. It is also important to educate oneself about the condition and its management.

3. What are some common misconceptions about living with a diagnosed condition?

Some common misconceptions about living with a diagnosed condition include assuming that all individuals with the same condition have the same experiences and symptoms, that a diagnosed condition defines a person's identity, and that individuals with a diagnosed condition are unable to live fulfilling lives.

4. How can one advocate for themselves when living with a diagnosed condition?

Advocating for oneself when living with a diagnosed condition involves being proactive in one's healthcare, communicating openly and effectively with healthcare professionals, knowing one's rights and responsibilities, and seeking support and resources when needed. It is also important to be assertive and confident in speaking up for one's needs.

5. What are some ways to manage the emotional impact of living with a diagnosed condition?

Managing the emotional impact of living with a diagnosed condition can involve seeking professional counseling or therapy, practicing self-care and stress management techniques, connecting with others who have a similar condition, and finding ways to stay positive and hopeful. It is also important to be patient and kind to oneself and to seek support from loved ones.

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