Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Living with social dysfunction.

  1. Oct 7, 2013 #1
    This discussion is meant to be along the lines of https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=703676&page=3 , although the premise is not to seek approval.

    I use the label "socially dysfunctional" in a very broad sense here (in an attempt to avoid the derogatory "socially retarded" that gets thrown around, but which I think describes me perfectly), not strictly sociophobes/people with social anxiety like myself, but in general anyone that has any difficulty whatsoever making meaningful/any relationships with individuals or groups of people, big or small, for whatever reason.

    For adults or otherwise independent people who feel adequately described by the above paragraph, I would like to hear how you go about your daily life, how your family, co-workers, or friends (if any) treat you about it. Are you happy with the way things are? If not, can you change something and if so, what is stopping you from doing it?

    I'll spill the beans: I'm in my mid to late 20's, don't have any friends, made it through college and high school without ever going on a date, and generally have a fairly low opinion of myself. I've only held a few unskilled jobs before my university education (started when I was 22, 26 now). Guess you could say I'm a "nerd" in the social sense, but unfortunately I don't have a "nerd's" grades to show for it (hasn't stopped college mates from coming to me when they want help/an explanation, which I always give and enjoy doing it). There are a number of reasons for my lack of social experience but that's not the point of this thread, as I'm more concerned with the immediate future rather than explaining my past (which generally causes discomfort for me). I am 100% sociophobic, walking into a bar or any casual social situation with people I don't know very well is nearly impossible for me.

    When I meet someone new and the conversation progresses beyond the subject at hand into personal matters, I usually end up cutting off the conversation or changing the subject. The reason is simple, I feel pretty embarrassed about my lack of life experiences and from past experiences of trying to open up, I generally don't like the type of looks or comments I get when people find out (if they pry hard enough) about my lack of social activity, lack of sentimental partners, etc. I have been berated regularly for not having a facebook account, for a mild example. Other interactions have just been downright hurtful and humiliating, and have been so many that I've ultimately given up on making friends or approaching potential sentimental partners altogether.

    What can I expect out of future casual interactions that I'll inevitably run into in a "real" job, for instance? I'm heading into my 30's and I feel like the past 8 years of my life haven't amounted to anything outside of two academic degrees (1 pre-university and one bachelors), neither of which are going to make me prosper, but at least one of them has given me some (actually a lot of) satisfaction while I was doing it. I'm trying to prolong that feeling by taking my chances at the academic ladder despite knowing well I'm not being the hottest applicant in the grad school app pile (could be my low self-esteem speaking here), but I'm still throwing out over a dozen applications in the next few weeks, while improving standardized test scores and doing non-stop gap-filling of my undergrad curriculum with self-study. Don't really have any plan B here, the employment situation is terrible where I live and I've pretty much exhausted all options that don't involve spending money on a masters (which I don't have) just to be employable, so I've got everything (literally all my savings) riding on this.

    I don't really know what I want to get out of this thread, just feeling lonely and lately I haven't been able to drown out the negative voices in my head with my usual escape routes: academics and the usual internet banalities/humor. Haven't seen the shrink in almost two months now (yep I'm on pills, going for almost a year now with clinical depression) and I figured writing something would be a good idea. I have been hitting the weights hard again and it does make me feel better on the outside (posture, less back pain, etc.) but not on the inside. But I'm not as much of a nervous wreck as I was just a few months ago and I feel like I'm at least doing something useful preparing my grad school apps, in lieu of my uneventful job hunt, while studying old and new stuff and trying to get better at what I want to do professionally some day, etc. I have started enjoying music again which I lost interest in for a long time, which is probably a positive thing.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 7, 2013 #2

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    That's going to make it pretty hard for anyone to help your reach your goal for this thread, since you don't have one.
     
  4. Oct 7, 2013 #3
    Oh we know what he wants to get out of it phinds. It's just painful to talk about and delicate too. Maybe others are less so than me and more able to help. Sorry Lava.
     
  5. Oct 7, 2013 #4

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Lava, when you do interact with people, how do you feel afterwards?

    (By interact I mean more than a minute of simple small talk.)
     
  6. Oct 8, 2013 #5
    Tired, exhausted, and glad it's over with for the most part.
     
  7. Oct 8, 2013 #6
    haha, I know how you feel. It's impossible for an extrovert to understand this. At least you're able to go to school. That's more than I could do. I'm in my mid fifties now and things aren't quite so bad. In fact things are mostly good. But when I was your age - it sucked.
     
  8. Oct 8, 2013 #7

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I'm an introvert too, but I think there is a spectrum of social avoidance. One one side are garden-variety introverts like me: we can get along just fine with people when we have to. But it's tiring.

    On the other side of the spectrum are people with social anxiety. This can be a horrible, paralyzing affliction. People who can't function because of social anxiety need to seek professional help because life is too short to only live a (less than one) fraction of a full life.
     
  9. Oct 9, 2013 #8
    TurtleMeister: What has changed between your younger years and your mid-50's? What are the things in your life right now that make it "mostly good"? I am curious.

    I am getting professional help, but really mainly for the depression. I've had very few sessions with the new shrink as I can only get about 1 per month (as much as public health can do for me right now). She knows about the social anxiety but hasn't really made any explicit references to it. She did make sure I was more or less realistic in my goals as to what to expect out of therapy, I know I'm not going to walk out of there as a different person. But I would like to know how to be happier with my condition. I used to think I'd be ok with staying single forever, but as I've gotten older I've found that a little hard to swallow. I'm pretty terrified of what people think of me in my situation at my age, which I assume is only going to be perceived even more negatively the older I get, making acceptance by others extremely difficult. I can only put up the "I don't care what other people think" attitude for so long.
     
  10. Oct 9, 2013 #9

    Borg

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    You have choices other than terrified or indifferent. Keep in mind that we're all human and everyone has their oddities - including the people you're worrying about. Just remember that when you're worried about what others think about you.

    What I've found works well is to ask about something that the other person has an interest in (obviously it's tough if you don't genuinely share their interest). For example, I had a coworker that I did not have a good working relationship with. I never felt very comfortable whenever I had to work with him. One day, I saw a picture of a dog on his desk and asked about it. It was weird - he lit up like a kid at Christmas just talking about his dogs for about 15 minutes. After that, we still weren't best buddies but it was a lot easier to work with him.

    BTW, I consider myself an extroverted introvert. I'm perfectly happy spending days not interacting with the outside world but I interact with others when it's needed.
     
  11. Oct 9, 2013 #10

    Akaisora

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I have experienced something similar.

    I don't have any "solid" or "deep" relationship with anyone, and most of my social interactions and relationships are on a superficial level. I also don't trust anyone and prefer to be alone most of the time. Nevertheless, I do interact with people and I can do well to achieve my goals if the said goals required interacting with people.

    I personally don't care; I don't hold social interactions in high regard. With that said, I only care about achieving certain things and being social isn't one of them.
     
  12. Oct 9, 2013 #11
    I don't think it's a good idea to try to "drown out the negative voices". You can get pills to try to fix it, but the simple fact is that you are probably not going to have a very fulfilling life unless you figure out how to relate to others in a way that you find rewarding. Given good enough parenting, people generally learn that when growing up, but that doesn't mean you can't make up for this later.
     
  13. Oct 9, 2013 #12

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    You're not being given medication for your social anxiety?

    You need to see a psychiatrist that can give you "therapy" if you like that, but can also give you medication that can actually relieve your symptoms. If the doctor you are seeing isn't really helping, go to another that cares more. Therapy can't fix problems in your brain. I know so many people on here that are functioning normally now thanks to medication.

    Medication is usually trial and error, you may have to try several different meds until you find the one right for you. Don't give up and think that this is something you have to battle alone, the right doctor and right medication will do wonders.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2013
  14. Oct 9, 2013 #13
    And pills can't fix problems in your life.
     
  15. Oct 9, 2013 #14

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    What they described isn't caused by a problem in their life, so the proper medication is needed, they need to be under the care of a competent psychiatrist who is a medical doctor with years spent studying problems with the brain.

    I'm not talking about tranquilizers and amphetamines, btw.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2013
  16. Oct 9, 2013 #15
    Well, he wrote that he's been taking pills for the last year. Surprisingly enough, it turns out that while, as you say, pills may relieve some symptoms, they do not help you relate to people in a satisfying way, nor do they absolve you of feelings of embarrassment and self-consciousness. That's not a "problem with the brain" except in the most literal sense of the word in which every psychological problem is a "problem with the brain".
     
  17. Oct 9, 2013 #16

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    And a good psychiatrist will also offer therapy if needed to help with the meds. Sounds like he may not be on the right meds. Sometimes all it takes is the right meds and those other feelings disappear.
     
  18. Oct 9, 2013 #17
    I guess that's true, but you could equally well say: sometimes all it takes is the right therapy and those other feelings disappear (for good, rather than for so long as you keep taking meds).
     
  19. Oct 9, 2013 #18

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    If the feelings are caused by an external source, yes. If the problem is within the brain, you can force yourself to suffer through it, if it's not so bad you need hospitalization, but why torture yourself? Of course sometimes the side effects of the medications are worse than the symptoms, there is no guarantee, but you won't know unless you try, and you may have to try a numbers of meds before you find the one that works for you.

    I suffer from anxiety and panic attacks and I would be in horrible shape if not for the medication I can take when an attack occurs, I only take it as needed, it has no side effects, I just feel normal, no panic. I don't feel drowsy or drugged or anything, I just feel...normal. If a person took this medication that didn't need it, they might feel drowsy.
     
  20. Oct 9, 2013 #19
    Well, every psychological problem is "within the brain", that doesn't mean that there's a pill for every psychological problem.

    I appreciate that pills can greatly improve your quality of life if you suffer from panic attacks (and that perhaps you personally haven't found therapy helpful?), but I don't think a long-term pattern of not being able to make friends and feeling embarrassed about it is quite the same thing as panic attacks. One is a relational problem of exactly the kind that proper therapy can help you with (through the provision of a safe and reliable therapeutic relationship), the other need not be (dunno what triggers your panic attacks and I don't intend to pry).
     
  21. Oct 9, 2013 #20

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    A psychological problem will be caused by an external situation, either current or a memory. The medications I am referring to aren't for issues with external causes.

    Not necessarily, it can be caused by triggers in the brain, they could have aspergers. We don't and can't know what the cause of the OP's problems are, if they are acquired from a life experience, or in the brain.

    Nothing triggers them, they're not caused by "situations". They will wake me up from a sound sleep, I'll be getting dressed, reading a book, making a sandwich, sitting on my porch listening to the peaceful breeze going through the trees.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2013
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Living with social dysfunction.
  1. Socializing (Replies: 14)

  2. A Living Will (Replies: 12)

  3. Social bookmarking (Replies: 1)

Loading...