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Local and isotropic the same?

  1. Oct 3, 2011 #1
    Hi

    Say I have two expressions of the form

    [tex]
    F(r, t) = \int{dr'\,dt'\,\,x(r,r',t,t')g(r',t')}
    [/tex]

    and

    [tex]
    F'(r, t) = \int{dt'\,\,x'(r,t,t')g'(r, t')}
    [/tex]

    It is clear that F' is local in space, whereas F is non-local in space. Is it correct of me to say that F' describes an isotropic object? I.e., does isotropic = translational invariance?

    Best,
    Niles.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 3, 2011 #2

    mathman

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    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    You should define the various symbols to make it a physics question. Right now they are mathematical expressions.
     
  4. Oct 3, 2011 #3
    Good point, thanks. Say "x" denotes the susceptibility and "g" the electric field.
     
  5. Oct 4, 2011 #4

    mathman

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    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    How about r, r', t, and t'.
     
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