1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Logarithmic plots

  1. Jun 6, 2008 #1
    [SOLVED] Logarithmic plots...

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    use logarithmic plots to test exponential and power law variations

    This statement appears in the Cambridge A'Level Syllabus

    Can somebody please explain what does this statement require from the student?

    Helpful links would be highly appreciated




    2. Relevant equations

    not relevent

    3. The attempt at a solution

    not relevent
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 6, 2008 #2

    tiny-tim

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Hi ay2k! :smile:

    It just means do a graph with axes showing log(y) and x, or log(y) and log(x), instead of y and x.

    The object is to get the students to choose a set of axes (a "plot") in which their experimental data should lie on a straight line! :biggrin:
     
  4. Jun 6, 2008 #3

    dynamicsolo

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    There will, in fact, be two different versions you will need. The one tiny-tim describes will give a straight line for power-law functions, those which have the form y = A(x^n) ; such plots are (or at least used to be) called log-log plots. The other type uses log(y) vs. x , which gives a straight line for exponential functions, having the form y = C(e^n) ; these are called semi-log or log-linear plots.
     
  5. Jun 6, 2008 #4
    with exponential cases....we use ln right?not lg i suppose...

    and how do we know that when to use ln or lg in exp case?
     
  6. Jun 6, 2008 #5
    with exponential cases....we use ln right?not lg i suppose...

    and if so, how do we know that when to use ln or lg in exp case?
     
  7. Jun 6, 2008 #6

    tiny-tim

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Hi ay2k! :smile:

    You can use log or ln, it doesn't matter.

    If you have log tables, use log.

    If you have ln tables, use ln.

    If you have both, use the base 10 one (I forget which way round it is! :rolleyes:), since that's easier! :smile:
     
  8. Jun 6, 2008 #7

    dynamicsolo

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    In one sense, it doesn't matter. Whatever base you use for the logarithm, a general exponential function y = C·(a^n) will still give a straight line on a semi-log plot, since a logarithm to any base of a constant a will be a constant as well. People use ln or log_10 according to their taste or the standards of their field; mathematicians and physicists generally use natural logarithms, while most other scientists and engineers prefer common (base 10) logarithms.
     
  9. Jun 6, 2008 #8
    thankyou...my problem is solved...
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Logarithmic plots
  1. Logarithm's and Such (Replies: 4)

  2. Logarithm's and Such (Replies: 12)

  3. Logarithmic equation (Replies: 15)

  4. Logarithmic equation (Replies: 3)

  5. Logarithmic Problem (Replies: 4)

Loading...