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Courses Looking for a physics course

  1. May 24, 2009 #1
    Hi! I'm a mathematician but I'm now stuyding some physics. I like it, but I am not completely satisfied with the presentation in ordinary books. I want to find a physics book with no fear for math! In traditional textbooks, line integrals, surface integrals, Stoke's theorem is always avoided! I hope someone could recommend a good math-based physics book. I'm especially interested in electricity and magnetism.
    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 24, 2009 #2
    I recommend a 2nd year college Electricity and Magnetism course. My preference, being an experimenter, would be for a course using MKS units. Thus quantities are volts, amps, Tesla, Coulombs, Farads, Henrys, amp-turns, meters etc. Avoid most EE courses (generally they minimize the math). Advanced EE electricial circuits courses MAY get into poles, zeroes, and stability diagrams.
     
  4. May 25, 2009 #3
    Last edited: May 25, 2009
  5. May 25, 2009 #4

    robphy

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  6. May 29, 2009 #5
    Hi,

    You might want to take a look at the following book:
    https://www.amazon.com/Foundations-...sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1243628545&sr=1-1"

    It basically discusses electromagnetism from an axiomatic point in terms of differential geometry. Especially if you are a mathematician this will probably be very interesting.
    Parts of it are available online on the homepage of the author:
    http://www.thp.uni-koeln.de/gravitation/mitarbeiter/Birkshowme.pdf"

    A few suggestions for other topics (I only cite books which are on a mathematically quite high level):
    Mechanics: Mathematical Methods in Classical Mechanics by V.I. Arnol'd
    Quantum Mechanics: Mathematical Concepts of Quantum Mechanics by Gustafson and Sigal
    and of course the books by Reed and Simon
    GR: Large Scale Structure of Space-time by Hawking and Ellis
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  7. May 29, 2009 #6
    Seconded.
     
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