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Lorentz transformation

  1. Aug 19, 2015 #1
    I can't understand the transformation can any one explain it to me.and suggest a good book on it.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 19, 2015 #2

    Orodruin

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    You do realize that you are essentially asking people to write you part of a textbook? You will get a lot more out of Physics Forums if you read a real textbook first and then ask about anything specific which you find problematic or unclear.
     
  4. Aug 19, 2015 #3
    My problem is that I don't know a good book to read.
     
  5. Aug 19, 2015 #4

    Orodruin

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    What is a good book depends a lot on your current level in physics. A physics university student is going to find books written for people who have not seen physics since high school too simplistic and so on. You are really giving too little information.

    Depending on your level, you might also have to come to terms with the fact that without several years of intensive studies, you may not really understand it.
     
  6. Aug 19, 2015 #5

    George Jones

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    Pursuing further Orodruin's tack ...

    Where have you seen Lorentz transformations? In a sophomore/junior U.S. modern physics course (physicists call these boosts along the x-axis)? In a (post)grad course on quantum field theory? Somewhere else?
     
  7. Aug 19, 2015 #6
    There is a course in my school about the special relativity,and i can not use this transformation correctly to solve problems,so i wanted to have deeper studies on it.
     
  8. Aug 19, 2015 #7

    micromass

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    Again: please give more information! Is this a High School course which happens to cover some SR? Is this a college course about General Physics which covers some SR? Is this a dedicated SR course? In which grade are you?
    What are the problems you're having with them. Can you give us a problem you cannot do and tell us why you cannot do it?
     
  9. Aug 19, 2015 #8

    Orodruin

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    But you have not even told us what kind of school you are going to, which makes it completely impossible for us to guess your level. If you want help you need to provide sufficient information, otherwise we would just be guessing wildly and people here are not the kind of people who like doing so.
     
  10. Aug 19, 2015 #9
    well i am going to high school and studying for astronomy Olympiad and one of the subjects i have got to go through is cosmology.
     
  11. Aug 19, 2015 #10

    George Jones

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    So I suspect you mean boosts restricted to one particular axis.
     
  12. Aug 19, 2015 #11

    Orodruin

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    You will then want a very non-mathematical treatment. You could try something like Relativity for poets by @bcrowell . It is a non-mathematical treatment of relativity which you can download for free.

    @bcrowell : I just noticed you have a bad page break between pages 55 and 57. Page 56 is a set of figures and page 57 only contains the words "earth's surface", just thought you might want to know.
     
  13. Aug 19, 2015 #12
    well what i want more is kinematics in special relativity
     
  14. Aug 19, 2015 #13

    George Jones

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    A short, good book that might be suitable for good high school students is "A Traveler's Guide to Spacetime: An Introduction to the Special Theory of Relativity" by Thomas Moore.
     
  15. Aug 20, 2015 #14
    I saw a question which i want to check if i am right or not.
    the question is about relativity of simultaneity and it asks to show the Einstein's train thought experiment result will be the same if we use something else instead of light,what i did is this:
     

    Attached Files:

  16. Aug 21, 2015 #15
    Ia the above writing understandable?
     
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