Losing Heisenbergs constant

  • Thread starter droog
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  • #1
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I'm very confused. Energy can be expressed as:

h.C/wavelength

So, in Planck units, the energy of the plank mass could be written

h-bar.C/Lp

h-bar is in units of m^2 S ^-1 and C is in m s^-1
In plank units h-bar=Lp^2 Tp^-1 and C=Lp/Tp
So h-bar.c/Lp=Lp^2. T^-1.Lp.T^-1.Lp^-1 = C^2

Giving energy for plank mass = C^2 and mass = 1

Where did Henisenberg’s constant go? How can it be lost by selecting a different form of notation?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Meir Achuz
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Any constant with diumension can be transformed away by using suitable dimensions. For instance, if light years are used for distance and years for time,
c disappears.
 
  • #3
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Any constant with diumension can be transformed away by using suitable dimensions. For instance, if light years are used for distance and years for time,
c disappears.
But surely we can't just "transform away" something like Heisenberg Uncertainty. I'm still missing something incredibly simple here.
 
  • #4
Meir Achuz
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The HUP comes from Fourier analysis where \Delta k \Delta x>1/2.
It is only when you want to talk in terms of momentum rather than k that hbar
enters.
 

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