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Medical Losing weight exposes nerves?

  1. Jul 2, 2009 #1

    DaveC426913

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    Lately, I've been finding spots on my body (hands) that are akin to a funny bone or (the knee/patella equivalent) , i.e. an exposed nerve.

    When I inadvertantly touch or tap them, they tingle or zap, just like a tiny shock.

    I'm so sure these are nerves I'm just going to assume there are nerves in these places.

    Two spots of note are indicated in the attached diagram:
    - the palm of my hand, right at the base, between the ... uh .. cleavage of my ... hand-buttocks :tongue2:
    - right behind the radial "bump" on the inside of my arm, below the thumb


    I've been steadily losing weight via regular gym visits. (I've lost weight before but this is the first time I've combined it with muscle-toning.)

    So, I guess the hypothesis I'm forming is that weight-loss and muscle-toning is burning fat from my body, exposing nerves that have heretofore been blanketed in fatty tissue.

    Anyone experienced this or heard of this?
     

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    Last edited: Jul 2, 2009
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  3. Jul 2, 2009 #2
    Just to be sure, these points are sensitive only when touched, or is there a relationship to how your muscles are exercised or your hand positioned?
     
  4. Jul 2, 2009 #3

    DaveC426913

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    Well, the sensation occurs any old time I tap them. I'm sitting here in the front of the TV, and I haven't been to the gym in 2 weeks (!$*&# city union strike!). I tap those spots, and bzzt.

    It is not unpleasant or painful. OK, well it's a bit unpleasant in the same way a knee-jerk tap at the doctor's is unpleasant.

    If I tap it enough, I can feel it radiate into the corresponding finger/thumb in exactly the way a minor electrical shock does.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2009
  5. Jul 3, 2009 #4
    Sorry, in that case I haven't a clue. There doesn't seem to be a major nerve bundle on the side of the wrist either, so it's even more curious.
     
  6. Jul 3, 2009 #5

    Moonbear

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    Those are spots where nerves pass. The one behind your thumb, if I understand your description, is the branch of the radial nerve that innervates the back of the hand as it passes through what is termed the "anatomical snuffbox." The other spot you're describing is where the median nerve passes through the carpal tunnel, and starts to give off branches to the thumb and other fingers. However, it is not normal to feel tingling just from touching those spots.

    Are you doing weight lifting as part of your exercise routine? Or anything else that involves gripping a bar, such as holding the handlebars of an exercise bike? Given the context, this is sounding more like a repetitive stress injury where you're actually pressing on an inflammed area that is compressing the deeper nerves. However, overly rapid weight loss or too much weight loss (such as in anorexia nervosa) can lead to nerve damage too. So, of course I have to give the standard disclaimer to check with a doctor. If it might be related to your exercise routine, give your wrist some time to rest and heal, then consult a trainer about form and wear a wrist support while doing your workout (you'll notice that a lot of gloves sold for weight lifting have an added bit of support around the wrist...they do more than just pad your grip, they do add some support too).
     
  7. Jul 3, 2009 #6

    DaveC426913

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    Instinct tells me this is not nerve damage from exercise. If it followed the exercise, or were worse when I exercised, I could see that. But it doesn't feel wrong. That and the fact that it's been several weeks now. The effect doesn't feel related directly to the immediate exercise but it might correspond more to longer-term weight loss (I grant that this is circular reasoning).
     
  8. Jul 5, 2009 #7

    Moonbear

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    Another possibility is that you did injure your wrist at some time during your exercise, maybe when you first started, and the inflammation is just persisting now, even though you've gotten stronger and have better form now. If it were just the spot near the base of your palm, I'd suspect carpal tunnel syndrome, but with more than one location doing that, which are branches of completely different nerves passing in different places, it is a bit odder.

    Is it one or both hands? How hard are you pressing? If you're pressing pretty hard, I could understand some tingling, but the nerves in the places you're describing in your hand are deep enough that light pressure shouldn't have that effect, even in a very thin person.

    I think it's worth a mention next time you have a check-up with your doctor (which you should be getting regularly anyway if you're on a diet and exercise regimen to lose weight).
     
  9. Jul 5, 2009 #8

    atyy

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    I think you should see a doctor if this doesn't go away in a couple of weeks, or sooner, if it is noticeably getting worse.
     
  10. Jul 5, 2009 #9

    atyy

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  11. Jul 5, 2009 #10

    DaveC426913

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    Both hands, same spots.

    Not pressing; tapping. At a specific spot. I've got to tap to zero in on the spot.

    And just a tap. Like pointing at an article in the yellow pages.

    A slightly harder tap makes the zap stronger.


    I visit the doc all regular-like for die-a-beat-me's.

    (No, don't get started on the whole Diabetes and nerve damage thing. My perfect, delicate little feet could feel a mosquito's wingbeat.)


    Anyway, I guess I have to accept the answers I'm getting, even if I don't like em. If I had been 100% sure, I would have had no need to ask online...
     
  12. Jul 6, 2009 #11
    gloves are really not necessary for weight lifting. they can actually increase the effective diameter of the bar and decrease grip. better to use a bit of chalk if it's allowed in your gym.
     
  13. Jul 6, 2009 #12

    DaveC426913

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    You haven't been following along.
    The purpose of the gloves in the case we are discussing has nothing to do with grip and everything to do with providing support for the muscles/tendons/etc.
     
  14. Jul 6, 2009 #13
    lol ! you don't have an injury, you've just learned where to tap to hit a nerve. i can actually duplicate the one on the side of the wrists on my own, but i guess my palm is too meaty for the other.

    and that pollicis muscle above there is one of the ones that needs training, to increase your pinch grip and to help support a weight resting in your palm. they don't need support, they are the support. if you can't support the weight on your own, then use less weight until you adapt. relying on "support" like that is only going to contribute to sloppy form and creating real injuries. and unless you're elderly, your skin should thicken up, too, adding more "support" in a natural way.
     
  15. Jul 6, 2009 #14
    The spot you indicated on the lower part of your palm is close to the ulular nerve (sp?). Cyclists usually have problems with this nerve and cycling gloves have extra padding in this area. I'm no doctor, but I severely doubt that your body would be burning the nerve-protecting fat first.
     
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