Stargazing Lunar Eclipse Jan 20-21, 2019

russ_watters

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Anyone else watching the lunar eclipse tonight? It starts at about 9:30PM EST, with totality at 11:41. It's cold and windy in PA, but at least it's mostly clear. Here's a couple of pre-eclipse photos:

LunarEclipse-s.jpg
Pre-Eclipse-s.jpg
 

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davenn

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unfortunately, it wasn't visible from my part of the world :frown:
 

jtbell

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I stepped outside to take a look with unaided eyes. The moon is still bright with a bit of darkening on one side.
 
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Cold, clear night here in Durham NC.

Nice chunk of it missing so far. :)

diogenesNY
 

LURCH

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West Michigan. Clear night; literally not a cloud to be found. Unfortunately, wind chill is -2°F.
 
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jtbell

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Looks like maybe 90% total now. The uneclipsed part is still bright enough to drown out any blood-red tint in the shadow.
 

scottdave

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Looks like maybe 90% total now. The uneclipsed part is still bright enough to drown out any blood-red tint in the shadow.
I can see it too in the Houston area. Taking a picture didn't work worth a flip, though. I can see a hint of dark red.
 

stefan r

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I have clouds
 

Charles Link

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Chicago has fairly clear skies. I saw it completely eclipsed about 10 minutes ago. :smile:## \\ ## (Fifteen minutes later:) It's now almost directly overhead, so I can no longer see it out my window that faces east.
 

Janus

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As is common for this time of the year in my part of the country, we had clouds all day.:frown:
 

jtbell

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Post #12 looks like about the maximum "totality" that I saw, i.e. not uniformly reddish but with some brightness at one side. It's probably highly unlikely for the center of the Earth's shadow to pass over the center of the moon's disk, so there's almost always some asymmetry.
 

russ_watters

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Post #12 looks like about the maximum "totality" that I saw, i.e. not uniformly reddish but with some brightness at one side.
Yes, it was taken right about maximum.
It's probably highly unlikely for the center of the Earth's shadow to pass over the center of the moon's disk, so there's almost always some asymmetry.
I was surprised to see the asymmetry. So what causes it? Is it due to atmospheric refraction bending a bit of sunlight around Earth?

[Edit; hmm, well I guess the red is too...]
 
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russ_watters

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Looks like the Moon was hit by an asteroid shortly before totality - bright enough to be seen with the unaided eye.
Awesome! I wasn't shooting continuously, so it is unlikely I caught it, but I'll definitely pore over my pics to check.
 

anorlunda

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Thanks for braving the cold night so we could see those beautiful pictures Russ.

We went out just 2 minutes before totality in central Florida. The range of colors was amazing.

We have that famous big blue marble picture of Earthrise seen from Apollo 8. Did NASA ever get a shot of Earth seen from the moon at the time of eclipse? I mean lunar eclipse from Earth's vantage which is solar eclipse from Moon's vantage. Earth must look like a big red ring.
 

russ_watters

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Did NASA ever get a shot of Earth seen from the moon at the time of eclipse? I mean lunar eclipse from Earth's vantage which is solar eclipse from Moon's vantage. Earth must look like a big red ring.
I don't see any with a few minutes google -- a solar eclipse, though.
 

russ_watters

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Here's a composite of 1" exposures stacked and processed separately from the raw images to bring out the star field. I'm very pleasantly surprised that almost all of the 1" subframes were usable, considering the wind.

1230AM-composite-crop.jpg


The forum software seems intent on re-sizing and softening it no matter how small I make it: Full size linked from facebook.
 

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We have that famous big blue marble picture of Earthrise seen from Apollo 8. Did NASA ever get a shot of Earth seen from the moon at the time of eclipse? I mean lunar eclipse from Earth's vantage which is solar eclipse from Moon's vantage. Earth must look like a big red ring.
JAXA, not NASA: Sort of

I still don't find any reports about an asteroid impact. An event seen by at least two independent cameras and one direct viewer - at a time where so many cameras were pointed at the Moon. How can that go without any attention, or how can that be anything else?
 

russ_watters

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I still don't find any reports about an asteroid impact. An event seen by at least two independent cameras and one direct viewer - at a time where so many cameras were pointed at the Moon. How can that go without any attention, or how can that be anything else?
I'm surprised - it's a great catch. I checked my photos and I didn't get it, unfortunately. I had it bracketed by just a couple of minutes.
 
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Scott Manley picked it up
It was clearly an asteroid. There are telescopes that routinely watch the Moon for impacts - but not during full Moon because you don't spot the impacts then. Well... there are people working on it, and LRO might find the new crater once it has been localized sufficiently.
 

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