Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Aerospace Mach 10

  1. Nov 11, 2004 #1
    There's a scramjet trying to achieve a velocity of Mach 10; it will do the flight on Monday, trying to improve the actual record of Mach 7. I hope it can achieve it. Here's an article
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2004
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 11, 2004 #2
    you're porbably talking about nasa's x-43a. i hope the final flight that is scheduled on monday 15 nov will go fine. i have heard about this amazing research few weeks ago and i think it is very exciting. if you want to know more, the following link gives a closer look at the x-43a mission.

  4. Nov 17, 2004 #3
    yeahhh!!!!! :smile:
    12000 km/h is 200 km/s. Better no think about it :rolleyes:

    What's the next step? According to wikipedia, the limit of the scramjet technology is superior to Mach 20....
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2004
  5. Nov 17, 2004 #4


    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Ya wanna try that one again...? :uhh:
  6. Nov 17, 2004 #5


    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Yes, NASA guys have achieved it. But do not forget it's only a subscaled model of a real engine (I think the aircraft is 1m lenght), and it has achieved such velocities only for a while. As far as I know, the Hyper-X project is going to be put apart by Bush derivating funds to Mars manned travel.

    In my opinion, achieving a succesfull supersonic combustion with high reliability and enough controlling, and designing a commercial engine is far beyond. Only very little is know about what happens into the combustion chamber at that velocity, and how the engineers are going to deal with the high drag and extreme high aerothermal flux.

    Anyway, congratulations to USA for this achievement. Also France and Japan sciencists have done a great job all over these years researching in supersonic combustion, so they have an small part of responsability at this event.
  7. Nov 17, 2004 #6
    Ok, a little less, then :biggrin:
  8. Nov 19, 2004 #7
  9. Nov 22, 2004 #8

    I've been asked to do a basic seminar on SCramjet in two weeks' time. Can you tell me where to find scramjet theory on the net? About the best place I found was Wikipedia, but that's just too basic.
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?