Machine learning vs statistics

  • Thread starter fog37
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Hello,

I am trying to wrap my head around the difference between machine learning and statistics for predictive purposes and interpretability...

Is there a sharp difference between the two in terms of predictive power? I understand how machine learning needs to be first trained with data to later make useful predictions, etc. Some of the used algorithms are the same we find in statistics (for ex., linear regression).

Given a set of data (not extremely larger), how is linear regression done with machine learning different from the more traditional linear regression?
 
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More specifically, how is linear regression done in statistics different from linear regression done with machine learning? Both seem identical processes to predict data we don't have from data we have....
 
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Machine learning sells better than statistics.
 
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I see...thanks.
 

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A lot of machine learning algorithms use neural networks. Neural networks often use functions that are highly nonlinear but allow a better fit to the "training data". There tends to be less emphasis on the statistical confidence of the results. The subject of neural networks is important to understand if you wish to work in machine learning. There is a wide variety of applications, from simply fitting data to having the network develop its own patterns and classifications.
 

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Last edited:
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I disagree with this as a summary of the differences.
"How is linear regression done in statistics different from linear regression done with machine learning" in your opinon?
 

FactChecker

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"How is linear regression done in statistics different from linear regression done with machine learning" in your opinon?
Oh, I stand corrected on that part. Linear regression is linear regression. But machine learning and artificial intelligence include so many other techniques that I think it is good to correct the misguided impression of the OP. That may be a reason for a different pay scale.
 

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