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Macroscopic tunneling

  1. Mar 25, 2010 #1
    On 8/16/09 a alxm wrote...

    Macroscopic objects have a quite definite location, and do not tunnel to any appreciable extent.​


    Another way to say it is: The location of a macroscopic object is only a little bit random, and the probability of tunneling is very very small.

    Is that correct?

    For example, the probability of a baseball tunneling to a location 1 meter away is not exactly zero, but it is very close to zero.

    Is that correct?

    Thanks, John
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 27, 2010 #2
    It's best said that the potential (which is described by our wave functions) is vanishingly small. This dampens out any possibilities of quantum like effects.

    The theory is due to our wavelengths, which are small because our macroscopic states have constituents all in a state of entanglement.
     
  4. Mar 27, 2010 #3
    Many, thanks for the reply!

    I'm sorry I don't understand your answer. When you say "vanishingly small" do you mean zero, or a little bit more than zero?

    I realize that my question is hypothetical. But I just want to know the answer.

    For an electron to jump 1 meter away (by tunneling) is very unlikely. However, the probability is not zero. Is it?

    Likewise the probability for a proton to jump 1 m is very small, but not zero.

    Likewise the probability for a hydrogen atom to jump 1 m is very small, but not zero.

    Likewise the probability for a baseball... is it zero or is it non-zero?

    Thanks!!

    john
     
  5. Mar 27, 2010 #4

    Thanks for replying - i love intuitive minds!! :)

    When you say "vanishingly small" do you mean zero, or a little bit more than zero?

    By vanishingly small, it can be considered in calculus as either an oscillating

    A value or one which is very close to the predicted Cosmological Constant

    I realize that my question is hypothetical. But I just want to know the answer.

    Sir, physics in general is a theoretical stage of possibilities. :)

    Likewise the probability for a proton to jump 1 m is very small, but not zero.

    By what mathematican certainty?? It's possible a couple of entangled/couples quarks can hav an energy highly undefined.. remember the OH MY GOD PARTILE ;) It;s wave function may be small, but equally, the wave function determining the Feynman Intergral Actions takes alln histories into recognition.
     
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