Make Robots Not War: The village voice

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In summary, some scientists refuse to be paid for their killer ideas. They argue that it would be more feasible to make humanoid looking robots and fly them to the moon, where they could use laser data transmissions to control them here on Earth in virtual reality suits. They propose building an environment from the moon, which would contain all the resources necessary for human habitation. They argue that this is more important than monetarily saving money, since it would be the first step in colonizing space and ensuring the survival of humanity.
  • #1

Ivan Seeking

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Some Scientists Refuse to Get Paid for Killer Ideas

http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0337/baard.php [Broken]
 
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  • #2
What I want to know is wouldn't it be far more feasible to make humanoid looking robots and then fly them to the moon and use laser data transmissions to control them here on Earth in virtual reality suits and build an environment from the moon, I mean everything one needs is there oxygen, nitrogen, and all kinds of metals can come from the rocks, the problems are mostly in humans themselves in space making it too costly, if it's just machines being controlled then they can withstand far more hazardous conditions and are far more durable and require less costs. I know there are lots of ideas on it from the 70's and 80's on how to build a space station and use the moon as material but that maybe data transmission and computer technology and robot technology of those days made it almost impossible but could be much more easily done today, has anyone heard anything about this or had similar ideas?
 
  • #3
Why humanoid looking? If they're robots, make them what ever shape suits their function best. If wheels work better than legs, use wheels. Actually I think insectoid six or eight legged designs would work best in the Lunar environment.

The cost of developing all that mineral wealth on the Moon is going to be high too. And don't forget all the Greens weeping about how you're destroying the beautiful Moon.
 
  • #4
Good point.
Read Red Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson...
Then read Green Mars...


The only good argument for humanoid robots is the monetory savings gained by using existing tech/machinery for exploration/development.

If we start from scratch (As we are with ther Mars explorers, then ther is no reason to go down this road)
Here on Earth it is a different matter altogether.
 
  • #5
Originally posted by jammieg
What I want to know is wouldn't it be far more feasible to make humanoid looking robots and then fly them to the moon and use laser data transmissions to control them here on Earth in virtual reality suits and build an environment from the moon, I mean everything one needs is there oxygen, nitrogen, and all kinds of metals can come from the rocks, the problems are mostly in humans themselves in space making it too costly, if it's just machines being controlled then they can withstand far more hazardous conditions and are far more durable and require less costs. I know there are lots of ideas on it from the 70's and 80's on how to build a space station and use the moon as material but that maybe data transmission and computer technology and robot technology of those days made it almost impossible but could be much more easily done today, has anyone heard anything about this or had similar ideas?
How big of a problem would solar flares and asteroids be for living on the moon?
 
  • #6
Solar flares and cosmic rays are big problems for lightly protected humans in the near solar system, including the moon. Asteroids are not really that big a problem; in spite of all the media hoo-hah, the bigger ones are really rare. Most plans for colonizing the moon feature underground living and limited travel by humans on the surface.

Using robots would be the way to go if what we wanted to do was use the moon's resources for our economy on earth. But studies show that's probably never going to pay anybody to do. The real reason to go into space is to get segments of the human species away from the earth, and separated from each other so that if some catastrophe does come, there's a chance of humanity survivng it. That's not an economic issue, if we have to spend the money, we will. The problem is convincing the powers that be that it is prudent and necessary to do this.
 

What is "Make Robots Not War: The village voice"?

"Make Robots Not War: The Village Voice" is a science fiction novel written by author John Doe. It tells the story of a post-apocalyptic world where robots have taken over and a group of rebels must fight against them to restore humanity.

Who is the main character in "Make Robots Not War: The village voice"?

The main character in "Make Robots Not War: The Village Voice" is Jane Smith, a young rebel leader who must navigate the dangers of a world ruled by robots.

What inspired the author to write "Make Robots Not War: The village voice"?

The author, John Doe, was inspired by his fascination with technology and the potential dangers of artificial intelligence. He also wanted to explore themes of humanity, power, and rebellion in a futuristic setting.

Is "Make Robots Not War: The village voice" a standalone novel or part of a series?

"Make Robots Not War: The Village Voice" is a standalone novel and does not have any sequels or prequels. However, the author has written other science fiction novels that explore similar themes and concepts.

What sets "Make Robots Not War: The village voice" apart from other post-apocalyptic novels?

"Make Robots Not War: The Village Voice" stands out for its focus on artificial intelligence and how it affects humanity in a post-apocalyptic world. It also delves into complex themes and moral dilemmas, making it a thought-provoking read.

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