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Making a big ice block

  1. Oct 1, 2009 #1
    I have an extremely old refrigerator.

    [and][STRIKE][/STRIKE]

    I want to properly insulate the freezer part, fill it with water and make a large ice block.
    Then expose it to sunlight and see how it melts. Pure experiment.

    I need an idea of a hydrophobic material or something, so I can take the block out of the fridge with, and remove easily (by heating maybe?).


    Or better, I can construct the block's recipient walls from the very same material and put it in the fridge, I need a very porous surface that the block will sit on and doesn't come off before the block melts down after exposure.

    Any help much appreciated.

    P.S.: This should not exceed 100$...
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 1, 2009 #2
    For the walls, you may want to try to make a silicone lining- it should be easy to get off if it is thick enough (silicone cures to around 300psi tensile strength) and it is hydrophobic and non porous.

    The base, well honestly my best guess for a cheap substrate that is highly porous would be glass insulation, perhaps on a foundation of cinder block. Until the water saturates the insulation there will be very little heat applied to the block from the ground. If you had all the money in the world I would say buy some aerogel.

    I might also like to add this could be dangerous as well as toxic as water expansion can rupture the pressurized sections.

    A cheap alternative route would be as follows, goto a hardware store and buy a plane, they run from 25-80 dollars depending on model- and a saw. If you have both great, next get a cooking tin from a grocery store- the kind you might put a turkey in. Freeze a block of ice with it- then another. Cut the blocks to desired size, plane them out- heat the surface with a torch and stack them up. The surfaces will refreeze. Just make sure to completely dry the tools after use.

    Also the services of an actual ice house may be best of all. I cannot imagine a block of ice you need being more then 15 dollars if you can manage to drive down to a local one. You can also fine online ones that will ship em out to you.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2009
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