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Other Making Connections for a job

  1. Oct 24, 2016 #1
    Hello,

    How do people usually make appropriate connections that can help enhance their chances to get a job?

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 24, 2016 #2
    Be a social butterfly at the places where your job granters are and places where people might know of them.
     
  4. Oct 24, 2016 #3

    symbolipoint

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    Actually go to a business location with a few copies of your resume and list of references, and actually introduce yourself BRIEFLY, and ask if the company might be able to use you in some position? Take their lead from there and cooperate. This may give no result or it may lead to a very short discussion, or it may soon or later, lead to an interview meeting. You do not know until you at least make a direct attempt at human-to-human presence and communication, even a short one.
     
  5. Oct 24, 2016 #4
    You have to put yourself out there. There is no other way about it. It takes courage at first, but gets easier as you grow in confidence and social skills increase.
     
  6. Oct 24, 2016 #5

    Choppy

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    It's not easy, particularly if you're not a naturally social person to begin with. And lot can really depend on the specifics of the particular industry you're targeting, but here are some general tips...
    1. Learn as much as you can about the industry and the type of position that you're applying for before hand. Some points are pretty obvious. Who are the major employers in the field? Who are the minor ones? What are the typical entry-level positions? What do employers look for in candidates for those positions? On top of those kinds of things, you also want to figure out more subtle things. What is the economy like in that sector? Is it booming or busting right now? In what season does most of the hiring happen? What are the next big things coming in that field? Brainstorm a list of these kinds of questions. That way, when you meet someone in the field willing to talk to you, you have a whole bunch of relevant questions ready to go.
    2. Trade shows and conferences. While they can be expensive, they can also be huge opportunities to meet people and learn about the field. Often these things will have a specific venue for job seekers. Employers like to recruit at these shows (as opposed to general job fairs) because there is a much higher likelihood of finding candidates who already know about the field. (Sometimes if you can't afford the fees, you can get in by volunteering too. This is also a great way to meet people.)
    3. As a student take advantage of co-operative programs and internships. Many companies hire out of such positions, and even if they don't, such programs can give you contacts in the field that you can draw on later.
    4. Look for any kind of "in" you can find. Follow up on alumni from your school. Ask around in your current social network of anyone knows anyone else who is in the field. You don't have to get hooked up with a hiring manager right away. Sometimes the point is to start a conversation with someone who's working in the field you want to get into. They can answer your questions and point you in the direction you need to go.
     
  7. Oct 25, 2016 #6

    MarneMath

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    I've always been a big fan of coffee meet-ups. When I was younger, I used to request coffee meet ups with more senior individuals within my company or people I would see on linkedin. I would say that 80-90% of the time the individual would be willing to meet up for 30 minutes and talk to me about their career. Some of those have evolved into 10 year relationship of mentorship. Now that i'm a director, I occasionally get request for meet ups from students or junior employees and I always say yes.

    The advantage of this is that it allows you to plan your career path with someone who has been there. There's a lot of advice my mentors gave me that has allowed me to move up in my field and eventually into my position.

    Of course, the first step is the scariest.
     
  8. Oct 25, 2016 #7

    tensor0910

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    Make friends with people. Real friends, not just the social media type.
    Explore the connections you already have; you might have a friend who knows a guy and you just didn't know it.

    Find people to connect with through social activities. Singles outings, Meetup.com. stuff like that.
     
  9. Oct 25, 2016 #8
    Thanks everyone. To be honest, I struggle socially. I'm a little reserved/shy and introverted. The small talk that most people enjoy isn't my thing. My social circle is very limited. We live in a culture where extroverts are preferred, and I'm afraid this is limiting my options. What can I do about this?
     
  10. Oct 25, 2016 #9

    tensor0910

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    Habitual small-talk avoider here.

    LinkedIn is a good place to start. It allows you to network with a wide range of people. But in all honesty, youre just gonna have to step outta your comfort zone and jump in with both feet.

    "We live in a culture where extroverts are preferred"

    This is pretty much 100% true. The extroverts are the ones that stick to the forefronts of people's mind, qualified or not, and are likely to be recommended for jobs.
     
  11. Oct 25, 2016 #10
    I'm networking and actually finding jobs using LinkedIn, but people keep telling me to connect, and I don't think having someone from a company where I would like to work as a connection would make me favorable. I feel I need more personal connection. In this regard, I'm not sure first how to meet in person, and second if I meet with someone, I'm unlikely to make a good impression. I mean I can be very formal, but in my experience people don't like formality.

    I find this to be true in everything in life, including romance and love. But here I'll stick with jobs, because it's the topic of this thread, and the title of this forum.
     
  12. Oct 25, 2016 #11
    Question: is adding a recruiter after an interview on LinkedIn is a good idea, especially if I didn't pass the interview with her/him? I don't know why, but I feel such moves make me look as if I'm begging ?:).
     
  13. Oct 25, 2016 #12

    symbolipoint

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    Something about what I suggested, to just bring your essential documents and GO TO A PLACE and say PLAINLY what you want, is that your social awkwardness really does not matter for it.
     
  14. Oct 25, 2016 #13
    And when I go to the place, whom should I talk to, and will they be willing to talk to me for 5-10 minutes?
     
  15. Oct 25, 2016 #14

    Choppy

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    Sure, that's totally understandable. And for the record, I don't think overcoming a tendency towards introversion is an easy task. Of course some people are naturally better at this kind of thing. The good news for those who aren't is that you can get better at being social with effort and practice. Some ideas to help...
    1. Read up on ways to improve your social confidence. One of the seminal books in this area is Dale Carnegie's "How to Win Friends and Influence People." While it's quite dated now, you might start with it and check out some more modern follow ups. Much of the advice in it is pretty straight forward from what I remember. Be honest. Try to foster a genuine interest in other people. Listen. Be courteous and conscientious about other peoples' time. Avoid complaining.
    2. One issue with confidence is a fear of not knowing what to say. As I mentioned earlier it will help enormously to have a set of prepared questions handy. Think of it as a set of elevator talking points. If you happened to get stuck in an elevator for two minutes with someone who was hiring for a position that you want, what would you ask him or her?
    3. Practice. You can't expect to be good at anything the first time you do it. So you might want to think about how you can put yourself into social situations where nothing all that important is riding on the outcome. Join a new club or a recreational sports team. Take an art class for fun. Do some volunteer work.
     
  16. Oct 25, 2016 #15

    symbolipoint

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    Whoever is at the front desk - speak to that person. Economically say what you are interested in. They might or might not be willing to talk to you for a minute or two; they might tell you the company is not hiring; they might say, "wait", while they go to tell another person (some manager or supervisor) who may or may not talk to you for a minute or two; just go to a place you might be interested, and ask.
     
  17. Oct 26, 2016 #16

    Stephen Tashi

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    I don't know how to arrange this type of situation, but I'll describe it. You find yourself at an event like a wedding, an art show, or a party and most of the people there know nothing technical about your profession. Then you meet someone who is the same field (who feels equally isolated) and your spend most of your time talking to them.

    Bonds form quickly in such situations - it even happens between people who are are not in exactly the same technical field. For a social situation to be productive in making connections in a given profession, it isn't necessary for it to contain a crowd of people in that field - besides yourself, one or two more will do.
     
  18. Oct 26, 2016 #17
    Depends on your time frame and job. What profession are you looking at?
     
  19. Oct 26, 2016 #18
    I'm looking for an position in software development or data science fields, and I have 0 practical experience, and I'm not a new graduate, which I think make things even harder because most positions require either experience for mid-senior levels or new graduate for entry-level positions!!
     
  20. Oct 26, 2016 #19
    Check to see whether there are local or regional chapters of appropriate professional societies or alumni societies near you. Some of these hold monthly or quarterly meetings. If so, join, and volunteer to serve. One way to get your foot in the door is to volunteer to do the scut work (such as "local arrangements" committee); someone needs to book a place, setup arrangements, cleanup, and ferry invited speakers around. This way you'll get to know established people in a smaller setting. Then you can work your way slowly up the ranks. I personally don't like formal networking events in which I'm thrown in a crowd of 100 strangers. Never developed the knack of mixing and mingling, shaking hands while holding a drink and a snack.

    Edit to Add: If there isn't a suitable chapter near you, consider taking the initiative of starting one.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2016
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