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Martin Gardner dies

  1. May 22, 2010 #1

    mgb_phys

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
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  3. May 22, 2010 #2

    Evo

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    R.i.p.
     
  4. May 22, 2010 #3

    lisab

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    Oh no :cry:!

    When I was in college, sometimes between classes I'd go down into the library archives to where the old Scientific American magazines were kept. Pull a random one out, find Gardner's "Mathematical Games" and lose myself for a bit. It was pure pleasure.

    RIP, Mr Gardner, and thank you for all those wonderful breaks from reality you gave me.
     
  5. May 23, 2010 #4

    Astronuc

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    Last edited: May 23, 2010
  6. May 23, 2010 #5

    Doc Al

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    Very sad news. :frown:
     
  7. May 23, 2010 #6
    Martin Gardner was a master of recreational mathematics, i.e. mathematical puzzles and games. Just two years ago I found one of his neat little books entitled "Aha! Insight" and I still enjoy reading it.
    Rip Mr. Gardner.
     
  8. May 24, 2010 #7

    turbo

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    His column in SA was always a favorite. 'Bye, sir.
     
  9. May 24, 2010 #8

    Borek

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    SA was not easily available in this part of the world when I was young, but I remember feasting on his column in late eighties, when i was able to put my hands on ten volumes of SA from seventies. Could be I even have somewhere here copies of these articles I found more interesting. Really sad news.
     
  10. May 24, 2010 #9
    I finally got myself to buy that $2 book off amazon of puzzles by Gardner last Friday after thinking on and off to do it for a month & then the next day he died :eek:. I had read his Calculus Made Easy re-release & I'd also heard he was associated with James Randi et al.

    A good man whose book I hope to enjoy :biggrin:
     
  11. May 25, 2010 #10

    S_Happens

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    I also have just purchased my first Martin Gardner book (less than two weeks ago). I had only recently learned of most of his work, and it's very sad to see such a wonderful resource already gone.
     
  12. Jun 8, 2010 #11

    epenguin

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  13. Jun 8, 2010 #12

    arildno

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    I will remember him mostly for his 1957 "Fads and fallacies", one of the true classics of healthy skepticism and sane humanism.

    It belongs right up there alongside Maxkay's work "Extraordinary popular Delusions or the Madness of Crowds"
     
  14. Jun 10, 2010 #13

    epenguin

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    Here another. There seems to have been quite a delay before the Times and Economist (and therefore I) heard - but the article is quite insightful.

    http://www.economist.com/node/16271035
     
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