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Mass of particules

  1. Mar 3, 2013 #1
    Hello,
    The problem is quite simple.
    Estimate the mass of particules that contains the earth's magnetosphere up to a distance of 100 times erath's radius (In the shadow cone of earth) and also up to the break point or stopping point of the side of the sun.The solar activity is at its minimum and the average density is 10 protons/cm³.
    Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 3, 2013 #2

    mfb

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    This looks like homework. What did you do so far?
    Where did you run into problems?
     
  4. Mar 3, 2013 #3
    Well indeed it's a homework and i didn't get anywhere i can't figure out how to calculate the mass of particules.
     
  5. Mar 3, 2013 #4

    mfb

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    You have a particle density. Do you know the mass of a proton?
    Do you know some relation between density in a volume and total mass? What do you need for that?
     
  6. Mar 3, 2013 #5
    Well, the mass of a proton is 1.67*10^-27 and i know that density equals volume divided by mass but i don't have a volume and i certainly don't see a way how to calculate it and furthermore there are distances which i don't knowwhat will be the use of them.
     
  7. Mar 3, 2013 #6
    The volume you need is described. First look up the radius of the Earth. Multiply that by 100. Then use geometry to calculate the volume. If areas are excluded work out the volume of the excluded regions
    and subtract those from the total volume. Your given the average density so it should be easy from there
     
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