1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Mass Spectrometer (B-field)

  1. Oct 21, 2007 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    The problem can be found here;

    http://www.physics.uprm.edu/~mark/courses/FISI3172_I2007/PracticeExamIII.pdf

    2. Relevant equations

    Ok, ok. I made some reaserch, and I found that the;

    radius of an ion orbit on a mass spectrometer = mv / qB

    where m = mass, v = velocity, q = charge, B = magnetic field.

    ok, now, if that holds true then;

    m = rqB / v


    3. The attempt at a solution

    so, the answers are the following;

    a) still don't know how the answer.

    b) increases

    c) increases

    d) decreases

    e) remain the same, since Temperature is not part of the equation, T will be a constant, and therefore the mass of the ions would stay the same?

    Can anyone verify this? And help me with the answer to A?
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 21, 2007 #2
    Ok, ok. I made some reaserch, and I found that the;

    radius of an ion orbit on a mass spectrometer = mv / qB

    where m = mass, v = velocity, q = charge, B = magnetic field.

    ok, now, if that holds true then;

    m = rqB / v

    so, the answers are the following;

    a) still don't know how the answer.

    b) increases

    c) increases

    d) decreases

    e) remain the same, since Temperature is not part of the equation, T will be a constant, and therefore the mass of the ions would stay the same?

    Can anyone verify this? And help me with the answer to A?
     
  4. Oct 21, 2007 #3
    anyone?
     
  5. Oct 21, 2007 #4
    up..
     
  6. Oct 21, 2007 #5
    well, last try before i give up.
     
  7. Oct 21, 2007 #6

    hage567

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    For the first part, think about F = qv x B. How do you think you can determine the charge given this equation?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Mass Spectrometer (B-field)
  1. Mass spectrometer (Replies: 1)

  2. Mass Spectrometer (Replies: 1)

  3. Mass spectrometer (Replies: 1)

Loading...