Mass & weight conversion :$

  1. 1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    A number of objects are taken to the moon, where the acceleration due to gravity is about 1/6 of earth's.Complete the following table:

    Item----------Mass on Earth-----Mass on Moon-----Weight on Moon---Weight on Moon

    Paper clip ---------1.2 g -------------- g --------------g(f) --------------- dyne

    Can of cola -------0.56 lb(m)----------lb(m) ------------lb(f) -- ------------- pdl

    Hammer------------1.3 kg -------------kg -------------kg(f) ----------------- N


    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution

    I think the mass on Moon will not change..right??!

    the weight on Moon(the third column ) = mass*9.8*1/6 ...!!

    what is ( dyne, pdl,N)?!! How to convert to these units ??




    THANX =)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Redbelly98

    Redbelly98 12,049
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Correct.
    Almost, but not quite.

    Moon weight = mass * g * (1/6) ​

    The numerical value of g depends on what system of units are being used. It's 9.8 m/s^2, but if you use cm or inches then it would be different than 9.8

    Those are all different force units.
    pdl is an abbreviation for poundals (different than pounds)
    N is Newtons.
     
  4. Redbelly98

    Thank you very much..

    Where can I get the formulas to convert into these units?!
     
  5. Moon weight = mass * g * (1/6)
    The numerical value of g depends on what system of units are being used. It's 9.8 m/s^2, but if you use cm or inches then it would be different than 9.8


    If I am using cm or inches .. what will the value be ??

    thanx again =)
     
  6. Redbelly98

    Redbelly98 12,049
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    To convert 9.8 m/s^2 into the other units, use these facts:

    1 m = ____ cm?
    1 m = ____ inches?

    From those conversion factors, use the normal methods for converting units.

    You might try a google search to see what dynes, poundals, or Newtons are. But your teacher/professor really should have talked about these in class already. Seriously, if he did not at least discuss what a Newton is, he should be fired.

    EDIT. The poundal is a rather obscure unit. I did find this info:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poundal
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2008
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