Mastering 3D Trajectory: A Guide for FPS Game Designers

In summary, the conversation is about designing a first person shooter game and the trajectory of a bullet. The formula for a 2D plane is being used but there is a need for a formula for a 3D plane. The Coriolis effect is mentioned as a possible factor in the trajectory and there is a link provided for external ballistics. The possibility of implementing a 3D formula is discussed.
  • #1
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Hello, I am designing a FPS in which I am planning for the trajectory of a bullet to follow this formula here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trajectory#Derivation_of_the_equation_of_motion"

I am not adding any drag or resistance a the moment, but the problem is, that all these trajectory formulas are in 2D planes.

I am not too familiar with physics and haven't taken any courses on it, so I was wondering if there exists a formula for a 3D plane, or if there is a way of converting the 2D equation easily

Thanks, any help or advice is greatly appreciated
 
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  • #2
the path of a projectile is 2d x,y. now if your looking to take on the Coriolis effect for an accurate representation then it would be x,y,z.

I'm not familiar enough with FPS to know if the gamer can handle the ability to calculate hitting a moving target with the Coriolis effect under duress. it may be a bit much for passive play but use full for trainers.

here's wiki's page on what your looking for: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/External_ballistics

hope that helps.
 
  • #3
I think this is what I am looking for

http://babek.info/libertybasicfiles/lbnews/nl130/proj3d.htm

Im going to try and implement this and see what happens
 
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  • #4
I see, but that can still be translated back to a 2d projectile path. the Cartesian coordinates are there only to locate the start and end points of the projectile while the path is still only 2d.

In actual form the effects of numerous forces cause the projectile to take a 3d path. that was what I thought you were after.
 
  • #5
!

I would recommend taking a course or doing some research on physics and specifically projectile motion. This will give you a better understanding of the principles involved in designing a realistic 3D trajectory for your FPS game. Additionally, there are many resources available online, such as tutorials and forums, where you can learn about converting 2D equations to 3D or finding specific formulas for 3D projectile motion.

It is important to note that adding drag and resistance to your trajectory calculations will greatly enhance the realism of your game. Without these factors, the trajectory of the bullet may not accurately reflect real-life physics.

I would also suggest consulting with other game designers or physicists to get their input and feedback on your trajectory calculations. Collaboration and feedback from others can greatly improve the accuracy and realism of your game design.

Overall, mastering 3D trajectory in game design requires a solid understanding of physics principles and constant experimentation and refinement. With dedication and research, you can achieve a realistic and immersive gaming experience for your players.
 

What is the 3D trajectory formula?

The 3D trajectory formula is a mathematical equation used to calculate the path of an object in three-dimensional space, taking into account factors such as velocity, angle of launch, and gravitational pull.

How is the 3D trajectory formula derived?

The 3D trajectory formula is derived from the laws of physics, specifically the equations of motion and gravity. It is a combination of mathematical principles and empirical data.

What are the variables in the 3D trajectory formula?

The variables in the 3D trajectory formula include the initial velocity of the object, the angle of launch, the acceleration due to gravity, and the time elapsed since launch.

Can the 3D trajectory formula be used for any object?

The 3D trajectory formula can be used for any object that follows a parabolic path, such as a projectile. However, it may not accurately predict the trajectory of objects that experience significant air resistance or are affected by other external forces.

How accurate is the 3D trajectory formula?

The accuracy of the 3D trajectory formula depends on the accuracy of the initial data and assumptions made. In ideal conditions, it can provide precise predictions, but in real-world situations, there may be some margin of error.

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