Master's Degree or Triple Major?

In summary: That would give you a pretty solid foundation. In summary, if you want to do a triple major in Chemical Engineering, you should consider a Masters in Science in order to maximize your education and career opportunities.
  • #1
omagdon7
95
0
I am currently a Chemical engineering student who is interested in pharmaceutical research. I planned on double majoring in biochemistry to help supplement my knowledge and after falling in love with math this year I begun to consider a triple major in math.

However a triple major takes the same amount of time as a combined BS/MS so which will be more useful to me as I would like to spend a minimum of time in school and begin my PhD work.
 
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  • #2
do they even allow you to triple major?

dont do it, a master's is more valuable than a triple major.
 
  • #3
depends on what you want to spend your career on...and whether you care about the money you spend in university...as said above a MSc is vary valauble but if your going into some sort of mathematical modelling in Chem/Biochem then the math major/minor will help...So unless you see yourself in using math to model in chem/biochem then it is useless(go do your MSc and perhaps sit in on math courses)
but if your going to want to use math then go for the extra major/minor then go do your Msc in the joint interdisplinary.
 
  • #4
if you want to learn for the heck of learning, then go ahead and triple major. If you want to have a degree that will give you an edge in getting a good job once you graduate, then get the masters.
 
  • #5
The math in Chemical Engineering is all inclusive - once you study on a graduate level you will take a course in Math methods for ChemE's and that will cover all the math you will ever want to learn.

Go for BS/MS in ChemE, and as far as Biochem is concerned you would only need 2-3 classes from that area for a Chemical (and Biological) Engineer
 
  • #6
Well my actual goal is to design drugs and/or drug delivery mechanisms. So now I am wondering if Chemical Engineering is even the right field?

What do you all feel would be the best major for this area of research? Also for a math minor I must do linear algebra and then the courses I was considering if I did only a minor were partial differential equations and numerical analysis plus something else.

I am also definitely going for a PhD if this affects anyones opinions.
 
  • #7
Best area would be PhD in Computational Biophysics/Biochemistry. Chemical Engineering is not even remotely appropriate for drug design - its for drug production, in large quantities and cheaply
 
  • #8
My other interests however include, nanoparticles and renewable energy.

Perhaps for my undergraduate studies Biochemistry and Material Sciences and Engineering would be best?
 
  • #9
Well its really all Physics+Math with just a few courses from Bio dept.. (Biochemistry, Microbiology, Physiology, Genetics, Organic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry)
 
  • #10
You really have no clue what you want to do, do you?

My math porfessor was a triple major in chemistry, math, and economics and he went to CalTech and finished in 4 years, so it is possible to finish in the normal amount of time and from there you could pursue a doctorate in the area that most interestes you.
 
  • #11
theCandyman said:
You really have no clue what you want to do, do you?

But then again, who does?
 
  • #12
chemistry/math/economics? in 4 years? is that including summer school?
cuz i can't see how that is possible unless 2 of those are minors.
 
  • #13
I know someone else who triple majored, in Math/physics/computer science and finished in 4 years. He had a lot of APs and was able to get the introductory/general ed courses out of the way. I think he took 18 credits/semester and attended summer sessions as well, so it is doable.
 
  • #14
i am doing a chemisty and math major w/ a econ minor. i have to take 1 extra semester, so i will not be graduating until the dec. this year. my school has extremely rigorous liberal arts program which is why it is taking forever to get my degrees.
 
  • #15
Wow! This forum truly makes me feel at home.
This is my 3rd semester at the University. I had originally planned to concentrate on Chemistry, but I've been considering more and more dual majoring in Math. Plus, since I am pretty far ahead in my Chemistry requirements, my school has a dual BS/MS program for Chemistry or Math. I was thinking about BS Chem/Math and working on MS Chem at the same time. I'd really be interested to hear anyone's feedback on this or omagdon7's situation.
 
  • #16
What do you all feel would be the best major for this area of research? Also for a math minor I must do linear algebra and then the courses I was considering if I did only a minor were partial differential equations and numerical analysis plus something else.



Definitely do a semester on abstract/modern algebra to get an intro to group theory.
 

Related to Master's Degree or Triple Major?

1. What is a Master's Degree?

A Master's Degree is a postgraduate academic degree that typically requires 1-2 years of study beyond a Bachelor's Degree. It is a more specialized and advanced degree that allows students to deepen their knowledge in a specific field.

2. What is the difference between a Master's Degree and a Triple Major?

A Master's Degree is a single degree that focuses on a specific subject, while a Triple Major involves studying and earning degrees in three different subjects. A Master's Degree typically requires more advanced coursework and a research project, while a Triple Major involves completing the requirements for each individual major.

3. Can I pursue a Master's Degree and a Triple Major at the same time?

It is possible to pursue a Master's Degree and a Triple Major at the same time, but it may be difficult to manage the workload and requirements for both simultaneously. It is important to carefully consider the time and effort required for each option before making a decision.

4. Do I need a Master's Degree or a Triple Major to be successful in my career?

The answer to this question depends on your career goals and aspirations. A Master's Degree may be more beneficial for certain careers that require specialized knowledge, while a Triple Major may be more useful for those seeking a broader education. It is important to research and consider the specific job market and requirements for your desired career path.

5. Can I switch from a Triple Major to a Master's Degree or vice versa?

It is possible to switch from a Triple Major to a Master's Degree or vice versa, but it may require additional coursework and time. It is important to consult with academic advisors and carefully plan out the necessary steps to make the switch successfully.

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