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Programs Masters degree?

  • Thread starter Holocene
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227
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Masters degree???

One of my friends has a B.S in physics, and a masters in mechanical engineering. He did it all in 6 years.

Now surely an appreciable amount of physics relates to mechanical engineering, but is it typically that easy to complete another "separate" major like that?

If I do 4 years of applied mathematics, could I then get a masters degree in say electrical engineering in only 2 years?

It just doesn't seem feasible. Maybe I am missing something?
 
686
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I don't know about applied math, but physics --> engineering is very much do-able. You don't learn all the specifics that an engineer would in his/her classes, but you know the math and you know the underlying physics anyway. It's just a matter of someone telling you and you will probably understand at that point.

But, of course, a physics BS going for an engineering MS isn't on the same level as an engineering BS going for an engineering MS. It WILL be harder for you, but do-able.

I can't say with applied math, though. You'd certainly have all the math down, but how much lab experience do you have? Taking measurements, understanding data and uncertainties, etc., is all very valuable for an engineer. Moreover, how much physics do you understand? If you don't know the engineering itself, you could at least understand where it comes from (physics). If you don't know either, it will also be pretty hard.
 
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Depends what you've taken. have you taken physics courses and/or any circuit theory? EE's also know how to program. Talk to a prospective department
 
7
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a bit off topic but is it easier to get into a masters program than a PhD one? I normally don't see separate procedures/application process but why judge both using the same criteria?
 
2,903
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Yes, the PhD requires a higher GPA. But I really dont think the difference is THAT significant. If you get into the MS, there's a very good chance for you to just shift over into a PHD instead.
 
486
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Yes, the PhD requires a higher GPA. But I really dont think the difference is THAT significant. If you get into the MS, there's a very good chance for you to just shift over into a PHD instead.
Not true in my maths department.
 
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What about a Chemistry BA to MS in engineering? What if you have taken as an undergrad in addition to the chem major: Mechanics, E&M, Modern as well as calculus through DiffEQ and Linear Algebra? In my school I think that's enough for a physics minor if you include the first year of intro.
 

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