Masters in MEMS-nanotech and minor in applied plasma?

In summary, the conversation discusses the academic options of someone who recently graduated with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. They are interested in pursuing further education and are considering the micro electro-mechanical systems - nanotechnology concentration and a minor in applied plasma physics at UCLA. The person providing the summary suggests that this combination would be a good fit and mentions other specializations to consider, such as biotechnology, chemical engineering, robotics, and materials science.
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Hi, I recently graduated with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. I'm currently exploring my academic options as to continuing education. After reading through the UCLA master's program concentrations, I came across the micro electro-mechanical systems - nanotechnology category. I found this interesting, as well as the minor in applied plasma physics. Would these two be a good combination where applied plasma physics can be applied to the MEMS?
 
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Are there any other specializations I should consider?Yes, a combination of micro electro-mechanical systems and nanotechnology with a minor in applied plasma physics would be a great fit for someone looking to pursue further education in that field. Combining these disciplines would give you a great understanding of how the two work together. Other specializations you could consider include biotechnology, chemical engineering, robotics, and materials science. Depending on your interests, any of these fields could be a great option for furthering your studies.
 

1. What is MEMS-nanotech and applied plasma?

MEMS-nanotech stands for Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems and involves the manipulation and fabrication of devices and structures at the micro and nanoscale. Applied plasma refers to the use of ionized gases for various applications, such as etching and deposition in micro and nanofabrication processes.

2. What are the benefits of pursuing a Masters in MEMS-nanotech and minor in applied plasma?

A Masters in MEMS-nanotech and minor in applied plasma can provide a comprehensive understanding of the principles and applications of micro and nanofabrication, as well as the use of plasma for these processes. This knowledge is highly sought after in industries such as semiconductor, biotechnology, and aerospace, making graduates in this field highly employable.

3. What kind of courses can I expect to take in this program?

Courses may vary by institution, but generally, you can expect to take classes in micro and nanofabrication, plasma physics, materials science, and device design and characterization. Some programs may also offer specialized courses in specific areas of MEMS-nanotech and applied plasma, such as biosensors or microfluidics.

4. What are the career opportunities for someone with a Masters in MEMS-nanotech and minor in applied plasma?

Graduates with this degree can pursue careers in a variety of industries, including microelectronics, biomedical devices, energy, and aerospace. They may work as process engineers, research scientists, or product developers, among other roles.

5. Are there any research opportunities available in this field?

Yes, there are many research opportunities available in the field of MEMS-nanotech and applied plasma. Many universities have dedicated research centers and labs for this area, and students may have the opportunity to work on cutting-edge projects with faculty and industry partners. Additionally, graduates with a Masters in this field may also go on to pursue a PhD and conduct their own research.

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