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Masters in nuclear engineering

  1. Nov 10, 2015 #1
    Hi guys.
    I'm a mechanical engineer, due to graduate this year if everything goes according to plan.
    I'm considering doing a masters in nuclear engineering (first honours then masters of course).
    Now, I not sure how useful this will be, or even if it will be of any advantage at all. The work is interesting, but that will be two additional years of not earning a salary, on top my four years already.

    The energy world actually seem to have enough nuclear engineers from where I'm standing, but this could be wrong. Also, the general negative public opinion of nuclear isn't helping at all.

    Any thoughts guys?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 12, 2015 #2
    Hmm, that's a dilemma, but it depends on your opinion, remember, there are not many places where to work, but a good specialist will always find where to work, so there are 3 ideas:
    1) Compare the salary/conditions, what you like more, etc, if nuclear, then continue learning, it won't affect you bad in the future, the only minus is that it takes 2 years.
    2) If you can, take a reduced course, so you could work already, but to be able to be a good worker in nuclear engineering, too.
    3)Start working, engineers are needed, you'll start to work earlier and you'll have free time, too, but not having nuclear knowledge.
     
  4. Nov 12, 2015 #3
    Thanks for the reply Qemikal. I think I'll start working and see if I can study part-time. That would be a win-win situation.
    Otherwise I guess I'll just start working.
     
  5. Nov 12, 2015 #4
    Win-Win-Lose, you'll be very busy, I would do the same, try finding a private company that doesn't require so much time to work for, so even if you're not paid as much as a full work day, you'll get experience.
     
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