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Material in Spanish

  1. Dec 26, 2008 #1

    LydiaAC

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  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 27, 2008 #2
    My attempt:

    ?Es el gato de Schrodinger vive o muerto?
    !!El gato es vive y muerto!!

    Come to think of this, there is an interesting idea. Which form of the verb do you use?

    Ser: To be (temoprary)
    Estar: To be (permenant)

    I supose quantum mechanically, we must always use the ser form of the verb.
     
  4. Dec 27, 2008 #3

    LydiaAC

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    The correct form in Spanish is

    "¿Esta el gato de Schrodinger vivo o muerto?
    !El gato esta vivo y muerto!


    The general rule is "estar" for something temporary and "ser" for something permanent, but it is not a perfect rule. In the entire Spanish speaking world we say "estar vivo" and "estar muerto". I only have read "es muerto" or "muerto es" in old texts in Spanish (or maybe in old songs).

    Lydia
     
  5. Dec 28, 2008 #4
    Looks like I had a sign error on that verb. Figured I'd give it a shot.
     
  6. Dec 28, 2008 #5

    fluidistic

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    For me the correct form would be "¿Está el gato de Schrodinger vivo o muerto?
    ¡Está vivo y muerto!"
    The "tilde" or "acento" is very important, because there exist "esta" (this), "ésta"(this one) and "está" (He/she/it is).
     
  7. Dec 28, 2008 #6
    "ésta"(this one) doesn't exist. For the accent being on the second syllabus the word must not end in n, s or vowel.
     
  8. Dec 29, 2008 #7

    fluidistic

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    Wrong. It does exists. Ask any Spanish speaker.
    Also, how do you explain that the word "país" has an accent on the second syllabus and not the word "seis"? Seis has only one syllabus while país has 2, due to the accent and still has an accent on the second syllabus while ending in an S.
    Check out ANY Spanish dictionary and look for "ésta". For example try altavista http://babelfish.yahoo.com/translate_txt and check it out. Or wikipedia or anything you can.
     
  9. Jan 5, 2009 #8
    fluidistic, I am a spanish speaker, from Panamá (central america).
    I have never been good in grammar or anything but never seen the word ésta written.
    I did some research and that word doesn't seem to exist.
    Check this link from the Royal Spanish Academy.
    Translations from yahoo and google are not actually accurate.
    The thing with "país" and "seis" is something with hiatus and diphthong which, as I told you before, I never understood grammar.
     
  10. Jan 5, 2009 #9

    LydiaAC

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    Fluidistic is correct, I don´t know how to put accent marks with the keybord of my Laptop so I didn´t do.

    The word "ésta" does exist, and is exactly like fluidistic says: when "this" is an adjective you write "esta" and when it is a pronoun, you must add a special accent mark know as "diacritic" because its purpose is distinguish it from the adjective version. Diacritic accents do not obey the general rules.
    To check the dictionary of the Royal Spanish Academy is not a good idea. Spanish differs from English because it is a very grammatical language. The verb "to love" translate "amar", but we have a lot of forms
    amo
    amas
    ama
    amamos
    amais
    aman
    ame´
    amaste
    amo´
    amaron
    and many, many more.
    The dictionary of the Royal Spanish Academy does not register any variation, only "amar". You actually can find "amo" but as a know meaning "master" not as a variation of the verb "amar"
    Asking a native speaker is always the better choice. I always do so when I try to understand English rules.
    Lydia AC
     
  11. Jan 30, 2009 #10
    actually guys here where I live, Uruguay "ésta" DOES exist, like Lydia said ... but its because we deform the spanish so much .. but it does have a meaning actually and its hard to explain.
    amor = love
    amais is more of the spanish from spain lol in latin america we don't use this one .
    Sorry this is my first post and hmm..sorry that it is so random and off topic lol .
     
  12. Oct 28, 2009 #11
    ...

    hi guys.. actually i want to learn spanish so i go here..can you please teach me..:))
     
  13. Oct 28, 2009 #12
    I am from Mexico and the word "ésta" is widely used here and like fluidistic said it's meaning is "this one", here's an example of how it is usually used:

    Yo compré manzanas. Ésta es la más bonita.

    I bought apples. This one is the prettiest.

    The word "ésta" is used when the noun has just been previously stated and it would sound unnatural repeating it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009
  14. Oct 28, 2009 #13

    fluidistic

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    A slight correction, it should read "Yo compré manzanas. "
     
  15. Oct 28, 2009 #14
    Oh yeah, sorry about that.
     
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