Math for grad school

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  • Thread starter yaganon
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  • #1
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I'm an undergrad chemical engineer. I may switch to chemistry or materials science/engineering. I've taken abstract algebra, which sucked a lot. I should have taken the other professor's section.

Anyways, I hate proofs. I'm wondering if I should continue math with real analysis. I heard that some people in grad school have to take undergrad math courses because they needed it, but haven't taken them in college. I don't think I will be needing anymore theoretical math, since I hate proofs and I don't need them for research in engineering.

On the other hand, I LOVE applied math. The things you can do with matrices are very interesting to me.

Can I have some suggestions
 

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  • #2
Some important topics I think are

Partial Differential Equations
Vector Calculus
Multiple Integrals
Fourier Series/ Transforms
Matrices/ Eigenvectors/ Eigenfunctions/ Eigenvalues

This is just some of the mathematics that I have covered in my physics degree to date.

Real analysis does include some topics like Hilbert Spaces, which I have come accross. But it seems to cover convergence and limits of sequences and things like that. I reckon there are better mathematics courses you could take.
 

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